90 MILES FROM HOME by Warren Miller
Kirkus Star

90 MILES FROM HOME

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Warren Miller is the author of three novels, The Way We Live Now, The Cool Will and The Sleep of Recon. This is an account of what he has seen in Cuba on his most recent trip, during the later part of 1960. And like most novelists who write about politics, Miller's book belongs in that special category of books devoted to a political fact which do not draw political conclusions. But in fairness it must be said that he is writing as a reporter would and is trying to be as objective as possible. He has interviewed Cubans, representatives of every class and of many occupations, and they speak for themselves here. And contrary to propagandist reports that Castro has the support of only 20% of the people the picture that Miller presents is far closer to logic and reality: what is left of the upper class and most of the middle class are now anti-Castro; beneficiaries of reforms -- the peasants, the working class and the intellectuals are solidly . He describes the various projects and radical improvements in several parts of Cuba which have resulted from the revolutionary reforms, the reactions of the people to topical events (such as the Bishops' Pastoral Letter), and the feelings of the country's writers and poets. Like other American writers before him Miller is most distressed by the ignorance of American officials in Cuba and by American newspaper accounts of day-to-day situations in Cuba. His account of the counter-revolutionary organizations in Miami leads one to believe that their primary characteristic is fatuity. Throughout his account, however, Miller remains distant from his material and will commit himself only so far as to say that he believes it is more important to understand what is going on in Cuba than to label it. He also believes that U.S. policy is designed only to alienate the Cubans and commit them more fully to the Socialist bloc. His book is intelligent, unquestionably readable and should receive attention.

Pub Date: May 1st, 1961
Publisher: Little, Brown