ALI AND THE GOLDEN EAGLE by Wayne Grover

ALI AND THE GOLDEN EAGLE

Age Range: 11 & up
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KIRKUS REVIEW

 An American who has lived in Saudi Arabia combines fact and fiction to honor the ancient art of falconry. Wayne, the narrator, rappels down a cliff into the village of Ezratu, where he meets a promising young falconer, Ali. The village--untouched by the oil-won advance of the rest of the country--seems self- reliant and (to Wayne's eye) very nearly a Shangri-La. Into his budding friendship with Ali, he brings a baby eagle (Samson), stolen from its nest, for Ali to train. Samson and the boy go on to win a falconry contest; meanwhile, Prince Faisal is so impressed by Ali's falconry that he brings electricity, roads, and medicine to Ezratu, leaving an open question: despite the well-intentioned, progressive thinking, will this be good or bad for the once-independent village? Though Grover's language is often clumsy and repetitive, his plotting is more than adequate and well supported by the noble Ali and his well-regarded father, jealous older brother Faud, and, of course, good-natured Wayne. The author's attempts as a cultural tour guide are admirable, but the story works best as a far-flung adventure. (Fiction. 11+)

Pub Date: April 1st, 1993
ISBN: 0-688-11385-0
Page count: 160pp
Publisher: Greenwillow
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 15th, 1993