THE COLONIES IN TRANSITION by Wesley Frank Craven

THE COLONIES IN TRANSITION

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This general history of the American Colonies from the time of the Restoration to the end of Queen Anne's War (1660-1713) is, as any such book must be, a record of England's posture and policies vis-a-vis her American possessions and the reaction of the colonials thereto. The period covered was pre-eminently a period of political, social and economic unrest both for the mother country and for the colonies, and Princetonian Craven pays particular attention to that phenomenon and its causes--but he weighs its context carefully, emphasizing, contrary to common but less Judicious opinions, that such unrest (even in its violent manifestations, such as Bacon's Rebellion in Virginia) was not in fact a sign of a desire on the part of the colonies to break with England. The essence of the imperial system was fixed by the very beginning of the eighteenth century, and it was to endure unchanged until the very eve of the Revolution. Professor Craven's approach is chronological and comprehensive, with particularly interesting and original chapters on the importance for the colonies of the Glorious Revolution and of England's wars with France, and on relations between the colonists and the Indians. His style is smoothly readable, a virtue rarely found in combination with that of impeccable scholarship. A commendable addition to the publisher's New American Nation Series, The Colonies in Transition is for the student as well as the serious general reader.

Pub Date: Feb. 28th, 1967
Publisher: Harper & Row