THE TRUMPETS OF NOVEMBER by Wesley S. Thurston

THE TRUMPETS OF NOVEMBER

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This unconscionably long, grubby, groggy, and worst of all, uninteresting novel deals with ""one chillingly convincing explanation of the act that shocked the world."" The Kennedy assassination, and appalling are the abuses of adversity. Here it is seen to be the work of a militant neo-fascist, racist, rightist group whose facade is one General Smedwith but most of the story deals with the General's second marriage to a wealthy New York woman; her son is a lush and locked up; his, Edward, is a disgrace--a ""comsymp"": and the General is impotent, even when belted (he likes the whip). In probably one of the preposterous feats of planned parenthood, he intends to use his son's sperm (even though Edward is a bad seed to begin with) to impregnate his wife. Representing the more enlightened forces here, are Sheila, a pretty English girl, Pike, a liberal writer, and Abby, a Negro freedom rider and these three enjoy a most remarkable intimacy (black white; male, female, Lesbian) and are indulging in some sexual byplay in the shower when another kind of fuse goes off. Mr. Thurston writes like a jackrabbit and this is his first-last novel since he died last year. De mortuis, et de gustibus.

Pub Date: March 22nd, 1967
Publisher: Geis