THE WEEKEND REAL ESTATE INVESTOR by Weston P. Hatfield

THE WEEKEND REAL ESTATE INVESTOR

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Group efforts, Hatfield contends, will lead to real estate riches faster than an individual approach. But instead of explicitly developing this thesis, he devotes most of the text to common-sense coverage of familiar ground, including detailed reviews of the financial mechanics involved in buying or selling property of all kinds. Hatfield's pointers, if not particularly startling, are at least sound and explicit. At the outset, he notes that those investing in real estate should be seeking equity growth, not a means of enhancing current income. For appreciation, he favors raw land. Next in his esteem come developed commercial sites (like shopping centers), office buildings, and apartments, in that order. Business tenants, Hatfield observes, are likelier to fulfill their obligations than apartment residents. In the helpful-hints department, he suggests that properties ten or more years old are most apt to be on the block, owing to the possibility that depreciation and tax benefits may be near exhaustion. Included are a number of case studies that illustrate the advantages (e.g., leverage and tax write-offs) and the perils (zoning restrictions and defective titles) of real-estate investment. Key points are lightly and smartly conveyed: e.g., ""rent-producing land tends to be easier to dispose of than undeveloped property. Not easy. Just easier."" But beyond some cursory discussion of the two-heads/two-bankrolls-are-better-than-one sort, Hatfield fails to explore either the potential or the mechanics of a team approach: prospects will have to work out the connection between small investor and big investment for themselves.

Pub Date: Oct. 29th, 1978
Publisher: McGraw-Hill