THE YOUNG MAN FROM DENVER by Will Fowler

THE YOUNG MAN FROM DENVER

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Gene Fowler, best known to the general public as a biographer, had a name that is still revered among journalists and the sporting set, was a man of many ""firsts"". As managing editor of Hearst's New York American he had much to do with the makeup on the face of modern journalism, and he helped develop the first fully organized action to recover stolen cars in Manhattan. ""His legend was built upon countless escapades, wild nights in the Park Row speaks, jousts with authority, uninhibited scrambles after news or excitement, during the last days when journalism was a three-ring circus."" The uproarious side of his nature has not been lost in his son's struggle to piece together the story of this man of wide fame; large chunks of his riotous history have been assembled from his diary and the reminiscences of his friends, including Dempsey, Runyon, and Fields. But as a sympathetic and generous family man, Gene Fowler shines through the whiskey fumes and cigarette haze with a rare gleam. A mystic he may have been, and a lifelong hypochondriac, but few men were his equal in the capacity to enjoy life and grow with his accomplishments. This is a fine memento of a vivid era, and an inspiring tribute to one of its most individualistic personalities, written by his son. Halftones.

Publisher: Doubleday