TEENAGE TREASURY OF OUR SCIENCE WORLD by

TEENAGE TREASURY OF OUR SCIENCE WORLD

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The term ""science"" is used in its broadest, most philosophical sense to encompass such technical disciplines as mathematics, archeology, botany and such seemingly intuitive ones as the science of living and loving. In this anthology, dozens of excerpts appear from the writings of such men as Edgar Allan Poe, Sinclair Lewis, Jules Verne, Paul de Kruif, even Thoreau. Each one is in some way concerned with science. There is a humorous story by Max Shulman centered around Dobie Gillis' definition of love, an examination of getting along with one's family by Frances Eisenberger who watched her father watch birds, a curious depiction of Emmy, one of the foremost human machines, selections from Hospital Sketches by Louisa May Alcott, Faraday's exposition on the candle, groups of poems by scientists. Though sublimely interesting in part, the thread which holds such diversified material together is hardly strong enough to forge a cohesive anthology.

Pub Date: Sept. 1st, 1961
Publisher: Funk & Wagnalls