JESUS IN THE SYNOPTIC GOSPELS by William C. Lynch

JESUS IN THE SYNOPTIC GOSPELS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Modern biblical scholarship distinguishes three fundamental levels of tradition in the synoptic gospels: first, the life and words of Jesus; second, the primitive Church's understanding of his words and teachings; and third, the understanding and use made of Jesus' life and words by the gospel authors. This book, though it necessarily takes cognizance of the first two levels, is concerned primarily with the third, for its purpose is not so much scriptural instruction as to help the Christian to experience Christ personally by means of the gospels and therefore to identify with him. Father Lynch's method has been to provide a general introduction to each of the synoptic gospels, to give a detailed exegesis or analysis of several germane passages from Matthew, Mark and Luke, and finally to give the reader a general but workable understanding of the principal guidelines and directions of contemporary biblical scholarship. The book is not, nor is it intended to be, original in concept or interpretation; it is a work of synthesis and of popularization, written more with a view toward spiritual enlightenment than toward intellectual stimulation. Within the frame-work of those limitations, it achieves its purpose and will be of some use to the intelligent, but not overly demanding, layman.

Pub Date: Oct. 1st, 1967
Publisher: Bruce