THE STORY OF PITNEY-BOWES by William Cahn

THE STORY OF PITNEY-BOWES

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The aftermath of the Industrial Revolution raised the tempo of mechanical inventions to an all-time high in the early 1900's. New ideas and the vivid journalism in which they were reported to the American public fired the imaginations of young men -- some of them with little training but an ability to visualize what they wanted to do -- some made a career of invention and gave us many of the devices we take for granted today. Arthur Pitney's devotion to his postage meter, his long struggle for recognition from the government, and his association with energetic Walter Bowes, were all part of the revolution in office practices that resulted from the adoption of labor-saving machines and increased efficiency. Company organization policies and the merchandising and promotion programs of the Pitney-Bowes operation were unique and stimulating, and helped to encourage other firms with original ideas. Biographical writing is always a difficult task, especially when dealing with the history of a business enterprise and its goods and services as well as the men who made it run. Mr. Cahn has done a superlative job of turning fairly routine historical reference information into a lively book that reflects justly upon the Great Era of private enterprise.

Publisher: Harper