A PSYCHOLOGY OF NOTHINGNESS by William F. Kraft

A PSYCHOLOGY OF NOTHINGNESS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Kraft tries to demonstrate how ""depression and anxiety can be joyful,"" as he analyzes in turn the joys of loneliness, aloneness, guilt, frustration, anger, boredom, apathy and anguish -- different ways of experiencing what he refers to as ""nothingness."" Feeling good about feeling bad -- like so many other of the popular home remedy schools of psychology -- is a whole lot faster and cheaper than years of old-fashioned psychoanalysis, but more likely to compound serious problems than to solve them. The author acknowledges a special debt to the writings of Martin Heidegger, but the resemblance of this simplistic theory of personality adjustment to either phenomenology or existentialism is slight indeed.

Pub Date: April 29th, 1974
Publisher: Westminster