YAHWEH AND THE GODS OF CANAAN: An Historical Analysis of Two Contrasting Faiths by William Foxwell Albright

YAHWEH AND THE GODS OF CANAAN: An Historical Analysis of Two Contrasting Faiths

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The range of this scholarly volume is wider than the title suggests. Three of the five long chapters deal specifically with the religions of Canaan, Israel, and Phoenecia. The first two, however, are concerned respectively with the early poetry of Israel, to which the author accredits a much greater antiquity than has commonly been assigned to it, and with the patriarchal element in the development of the Hebraic people. Throughout the discussion of these topics, the author brings to bear an erudition that ranges widely over many related topics. The effect is to give the reader a comprehension of many aspects of the whole historical and cultural developments that took place in the Middle East from a time at least as far back as the fifth millenium, B.C. Dr. Albright, one of the foremost contemporary Old Testament scholars, makes considerable use of recent archeological discoveries to offer revision of theories and points of view current up until the past quarter century. Originally delivered as the Jordan Lectures for 1965 at the University of London, this volume will be of great interest to scholars, but is hardly accessible to less competent readers.

Pub Date: Sept. 6th, 1968
Publisher: Doubleday