RUSSIAN FRONTIERS by William G. Bray

RUSSIAN FRONTIERS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Russian expansion and imperialism, including the vast broadening of Russian frontiers from 1462 to the present, occupies this rather laborious but interesting book. The author has dug deep into the resources of history for his material. From the time of early Muscovy, through the great nationalistic Czars like Ivan and Peter, and into the present Soviet Communist era, we see Russian minds at work in an effort to enlarge and consolidate a huge empire for themselves. Of especial interest is how, through wars and intrigues in the Ukraine, Armenia, the Crimea, and far east along the borders of China, the Russian bear swelled and grew. Data on how Russia bullied and deceived China in the 19th Century is alone worthy of a book. World War II gains, and Stalinist diplomatic anoeuvers at Teheran, Yalta, and Potsdam, complete with details of how FDR attempted to deal with Stalin, bring the story up to our own times. The author concludes with a warning against compromises with Russia and calls for a ""stand firm"" policy. A worthwhile book, but one marred by the author's stridency, and by a more than liberal use of quotes from other sources.

Pub Date: Feb. 27th, 1963
Publisher: Bobbs-Merrill