GARDENING FOR COLOR by William H. Clark

GARDENING FOR COLOR

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Gardening the Small Place met practically every requirement-for my money- and the final test seems to be that a copy loaned is never returned until I insist that the borrower purchase his own and return mine. Gardening for Color is a bit more specialized, but in its field equally down-to-earth and practical, a book for reference and consultation, but also a book for basic and fundamental principles. A great deal more ground is covered than the title indicates. Introductory chapters lay the groundwork of basic principles of color, and the basic principles of color, and the basic thinking of the author along lines of purpose, procedure, materials. He warns continually that all gardening requires planning and work, and continuous attention; while gardening for color requires even more specific planning and work and continuous attention. But the end result should mean color from March to November, while even late Fall and Winter can have color in bark and twigs, in berries and fruits. Trees, shrubs, wines, flowering bulbs, perennials, and annuals for fill ins are given full measure. Extensive lists, specialized and general, but all linked by focus on color, make this a book for constant reference. And in final summary, Clark stresses again the need for TIME. Tops in the field.

Pub Date: Aug. 24th, 1954
Publisher: Little, Brown