THE BOOK OF VIRTUES FOR YOUNG PEOPLE

A book with a mission—its purpose, in some people's minds, could not be more timely nor more necessary. Like former Secretary of Education Bennett's Book of Virtues (1993) for adults, this is a collection of short stories, poems, fables, and excerpts organized into ten chapters: Self-Discipline, Compassion, Responsibility, Friendship, Work, Courage, Perseverance, Honesty, Loyalty, and Faith. Each begins with a brief essay; these are sharp and to the point. Most of the entries, from a wide variety of cultures and eras, have a sentence or two of nonprovincial context to make the link to the featured virtue. The selections are compelling and appropriate, by contributors ranging from the well known to the obscure. This is not a book to hand to children to read through by themselves, but for sharing in short spans with a thoughtful adult. Along with other readings, from the concurrent to the adverse, it could serve as a basis for an ongoing series of discussions among families or in classrooms. The virtues espoused, assumed to be objective categories rooted in common sense and in universal moral imperatives, are as perennial as the grass, and even if they have become buzzwords in today's political climate, the book is not just for the ethically challenged. (Anthology. 11-13)

Pub Date: May 1, 1995

ISBN: 0-382-24923-2

Page Count: 384

Publisher: N/A

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 15, 1995

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

LESSONS OF THE GAME

A new student teacher and a young San Antonio high school football coach score “a touchdown for love” in this steamy but decorous romance. Before Kaylene Morales even reports to her supervising teacher, she manages to slop mop water over hunky coach Alex Garrison. The relationship develops from there (though it actually began ten years before, when Alex was her older brother’s classmate and she had a mad crush on him), into long phone conversations, dinners, passionate necking on the sofa, a falling out while Kaylene frets over Alex’s preoccupation with that “hard-hearted wench” football, and finally a climactic clinch and proposal. In the meantime, as Alex juggles his growing love with the heavy demands of Texas football, Kaylene throws out her dull lesson plans for innovative new ones, and endures mild challenges from her students. Romance fans and other tenderhearts will sigh over Bertrand’s mauve prose, no matter how unpolished it is. (Fiction. 11-13)

Pub Date: Dec. 30, 1998

ISBN: 1-55885-245-X

Page Count: 146

Publisher: N/A

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 1998

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

THE HEARTBEAT OF HALFTIME

Wunderli (Blue Between the Clouds, 1992) turns on the afterburners in this wild tale of a mediocre junior high football team whose players propel themselves into the championship, fueled by anger, grief, and desire. With only two wins—and those were flukes—in the last couple of years, Wing, Sparky, Taco Bell, and the rest of the Olympus Titans have built a solid losing tradition, but the addition of a new coach and a crazed middle linebacker (dubbed ``Spray Can'' for his lisp) changes the chemistry drastically. Everyone suddenly discovers something to prove—particularly Wing, the narrator, who is watching with fury his once robust father die of cancer. A string of exciting victories ensues, capped by a glorious championship game and an equally glorious food fight. With its belching contests and other vulgar behavior, broadly drawn characters, and a hilarious, disgusting pregame ritual, this is not a story for delicate sensibilities, but Wing's relationship with his father is thoughtfully handled, as is the way he comes to terms with his rage and grief. It's predictable, TV-movie fodder, but unusually vivid, thanks to some strong emotions and plenty of action. (Fiction. 11-13)

Pub Date: June 1, 1996

ISBN: 0-8050-4713-1

Page Count: 182

Publisher: Henry Holt

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 1996

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet
more