UNDERSTANDING YOUR TEENAGE BOY by William J. George

UNDERSTANDING YOUR TEENAGE BOY

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

It is not easy to be good-natured about this book. The basic provocation occurs when the reader discovers that ""William J. George is the pseudonym of a Catholic psychologist and counselor."" One is taken aback that the author, since he is writing within the limits of a field where, presumably, he is competent, does not care to sign his name to his work. But then, upon reading the book, one understands all: no psychologist in his right mind would sign his name to it. The book comprises thirty-seven chapters, divided loosely into ""Home Situations,"" ""Social Situations,"" ""School Situations,"" ""Family Situations,"" and a catch-all ""Situations Not Discussed Specifically."" Each division rambles through a few oversimplified case histories haphazardly connected by a few lines of text, the whole of which, in addition to being irritatingly patronizing, is a study in superficiality. For example, the adult male not too far removed from adolescence will recall his most persistent preoccupation during that period: sex. Yet, Mr. George thinks the subject worth only about a thousand words -- most of them devoted to the problem of Chuck, who liked girlie magazines. And so forth for the other ""problems"" and ""solutions."" Heaven preserve parents from pseudonymous psychologists. Not recommended.

Publisher: Sheed & Ward