A DAY IN THE LIFE OF A MARINE BIOLOGIST by William Jaspersohn

A DAY IN THE LIFE OF A MARINE BIOLOGIST

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A specialty in taxonomy wouldn't seem to make for an exciting subject, but Jaspersohn conveys its attraction for Arthur Humes on the first page, where he shows the gray-haired marine biologist with a specimen on the beach and evokes the ""simpler times"" in the '20s when Arthur's family summered on Cape Cod and the boy collected seashells and sought out their names, as ""Naming is the start of knowing."" Arthur's love for his work, which includes teaching graduate students at the Boston University Marine Program (BUMP) in Woods Hole, is emphasized throughout, and Jaspersohn introduces both his day-to-day work and his field of study in a smoothly integrated photo-profile. A number of specimens of intertidal life (many shown in the collectors' hands) are included in the photos of an island field trip with Dr. Humes and his students, along with some collecting procedures; and some background on different kinds of intertidal zones is presented by ""Arthur"" himself in a pre-trip lecture to the students. Specific aspects of marine biology are shown via various advanced BUMP students and their particular projects (such as studying the relationship between zooplankton and fish population, the effects of offshore oil drilling on lobsters, the limits on osprey population, or the nervous system of lobsters). Still with the students, Jaspersohn notes that ""the Great Sippewissett Marsh, which is north of Woods Hole, is the most researched marsh in the world."" Then it's back to Dr. Humes and his specialty, the tiny copepods, of which he has discovered some 400 new species in the past 30 years. For those inclined to pursue ""the beautiful truth about marine biology,"" an inviting orientation.

Pub Date: April 30th, 1982
Publisher: Little, Brown