INDIANS OF THE NORTHERN PLAINS by William K. Powers

INDIANS OF THE NORTHERN PLAINS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

With Tunis-type illustrations and an adequate index, this would be a redoubtable record of life among the Northern Plains Indians from pre-European times to the present; as it stands it is still the most substantial coverage of the subject. Described in detail are (as per the chapter headings). The People; Dwellings, Transportation, Communication; The Quest for Food; The Warrior Nations; The Spirit Path; Arts and Crafts; Music and Dance; Games and Sports; Language. ""The People"" profiles each tribe but their separate practices and traits are noted wherever relevant. Typical of the way information is interrelated is the observation that languages unintelligible from tribe to tribe often came from common stocks; that the Indian vocabulary was huge (no half-witted ""Ugh""); that it expanded in response to circumstances; that today the nouns are mostly English. From first-hand study (on a foundation grant), the author testifies to the efficacy of certain Indian ceremonies. ""Famous Men and Battles"" and ""The White Man's Road"" review the historical record in an attempt to interpret the Indian point of view. In toto, a hefty, solid-looking book with no visual assist (the photos are seldom attractive or instructive) -- but what a lode of interesting information.

Pub Date: July 3rd, 1969
Publisher: Putnam