STRANGE LANDS AND FRIENDLY PEOPLE by William O. Douglas
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STRANGE LANDS AND FRIENDLY PEOPLE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A worthy companion to the earlier Men and Mountains this continues Douglas' ""without folio or official status"" wanderings, this time around Greece, Persia, Kurdistan, Luristan, Arabia, Mos, Israel and India. He was available to goatherds as well as potentates, alert to Communist threats and colors, aware of the omnipresent Soviet intelligence, and sensitive to revolutionary influences that might have importance in the future. He found hospitality, not to be forgotten meetings with tribes and individuals; he makes clear that though there are different worlds all humans are equal; he makes no bones about failing in love with India and its warm soul; he is awed by the exciting challenge of Israel; he has recommendations for American action abroad: negative policies bring in train the legacy of the hatred of the British -- ideas will win, not dollars -- foreign policy should be made understandable in terms of Asiatic aspirations -- we should learn about the standard of life instead of talking about the standard of living. A book tumbling with memories, with personal interest, with a firm belief in man's possible humanity to men -- this, while friendly, is vivid foreign reporting.

Pub Date: Nov. 1st, 1951
ISBN: 1406772046
Publisher: Harper