THROUGH MY OWN EYES: An Awakened Unconscious by

THROUGH MY OWN EYES: An Awakened Unconscious

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Through his nearly two dozen books and his Ladies' Home Journal column, Dr. Rubin has amassed a large popular following--among whom there may be some readers for these fuzzy, disconnected, largely disembodied reminiscences. The book consists of three parts. Part I: a teenage experience on an unnamed island where Rubin learns the ways of mystic thought from some wise and loving Japanese friends. Part II: a series of stream-of-consciousness vignettes of unrelated awakenings (Rubin wakes to find he's a ""collector of cunts"" in peep shows; a maverick Navy acquaintance is brought up on phony charges; a celebrity who draws huge crowds can't overcome a fear of speaking). Part III: somewhat more ruminative recollections, set in New York, wherein we hear more about Rubin's family relationships (his competition with his father, his mother's old-age complaints, his son's sudden leg tumor). To give an impressionistic sense of an unconscious being formed, external information is minimized throughout; and some of the implied links are tenuous if not utterly trivial. (Rubin, for instance, thinks ""much ado about nothing""--then rides in a taxi whose driver professes to be a Shakespeare fanatic particularly attached to that play.) Except for Rubin admirers, the net effect is apt to be studied and trite.

Pub Date: April 8th, 1982
Publisher: Macmillan