THE FACE OF INNOCENCE by William Sansom
Kirkus Star

THE FACE OF INNOCENCE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The second novel by one of the most gifted of the younger English writers, this is the most accessible of Sansom's works-which have also included several short story collections. Here for the first time he has worked away from the Kafka influence and the allegorical intent; stylistically, he has disposed of his mannerisms, substituted a more familiar, relaxed prose which is still ably subtle and suggestive; and the chill to clinical intellect now takes on a softer tone. Here it is a writer, in the rather uncomfortable status of the friend of the family, who tells the story of the marriage of the Camberleys; Harry, a somewhat obvious, limited, successful young man, and Eve who is charming, uncertain, and a preposterous pathological liar. From the start of their marriage-in England- and Harry's adaptation to Eve's impossible inventions, this follows them to the Riviera where for the first time the stories stop, as Eve has an experience which makes reality more desirable than the dream; and finally back to England, and a bitter brush with the truth which drives Eve to an attempted suicide...A discerning performance which is precise, intuitive, sophisticated, and will appeal to an acquired audience.

Pub Date: Aug. 10th, 1951
Publisher: Harcourt, Brace