DANGEROUS COMPANY: Inside the World's Hottest Trouble Spots with a Pulitzer Prize-Winning War Correspondent by William Tuohy

DANGEROUS COMPANY: Inside the World's Hottest Trouble Spots with a Pulitzer Prize-Winning War Correspondent

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

Written by a foreign correspondent for the Los Angeles Times and Newsweek, these memoirs are delivered in a style one might expect from such a seasoned source--vivid, fast-paced, and breezy. Tuohy's career took him to the world's trouble spots indeed--Vietnam, Golan Heights, Ulster, and Beirut, to name a few. A major part of the book is devoted to Vietnam, an assignment for which Tuohy won the Pulitzer in 1968. From cocktail parties to trenches, Tuohy covers all--senseless carnage, erroneous body counts, and the reporters' bravery and camaraderie in the face of death. Not among the ""advocacy reporters,"" Tuohy criticized Washington, but never took a stance on the war--in fact, he doesn't offer substantial political analysis anywhere in these memoirs. But his behind-the-scenes descriptions are chock-full of celebrity gossip and entertaining anecdotes. He recounts, for instance, how as a young reporter he arrived late to his own engagement party in order to expedite Newsweek's cover story on the Cuban missile crisis: he got the story, but lost the fianceÉ. At end, despite the personal casualties, war traumas, disillusions, and long hours, Tuohy loses neither his verve nor his starry-eyed idealism about the profession. ""Has it been worth it kicking around the world?"" he asks. ""Yes."" Good company.

Pub Date: Aug. 18th, 1987
Publisher: Morrow