EACH HIS OWN TYRANT by Wingfield Mope

EACH HIS OWN TYRANT

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Wingfield Hope is an English author who won acclaim for her previous books-Life Together and Other People. Now in her new book she explores the subject of immature adults whose lives are tyrannized by a quality of ""Childishness"" locked within them which influences their behavior and personality. E.B. Strauss, an eminent expert in the field of psychological medicine, explains in his introduction that the book is not- nor is it intended to be- a learned treatise on character neuroses. Obviously, the fictional ""case histories"" used here lessen the value of the book for readers seriously interested in actual cases and their solutions. There is Alice, whose early years were marked by maternal neglect, and Hugh who suffered from maternal over-protection. Emotional storms engendered by these childhood experiences turn Alice into an over-suggestive, suspicious, thoroughly unlikable woman, entirely too self-centered to remain in the Convent she entered as a postulant. Hugh, on the other hand, undermines an otherwise happy marriage to a girl he truly loves. How each discovers -- without resorting to the psychiatrist's couch- the deep-seated reason for their difficulties and resolve them, makes a fairly intriguing story. The author has herself been dedicated to helping others and is able to throw light on the ""tyrant child"" theory to enable parents and educators to come to awareness of this problem and its possible evolvement.

Pub Date: May 24th, 1961
Publisher: Sheed & Ward