JOURNEY WITH GENIUS by Witter Bynner
Kirkus Star

JOURNEY WITH GENIUS

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

Subtitled Recollections and this intimate reconstruction by the American poet of Lawrence's Mexican journey, although less biographically inclusive than Aldington's estimate (-1950 P. 192) is in many ways intensely illuminating. Lawrence's days in Mexico, days which forged the formal a nervous, irritating and often purgatorial cycle of theoretical, emotional with the primitive Indian culture and Lawrence's innate timidity when confronted with a pristine human mass culture in which he hoped to find an umbilical relation to the dark primeval god. The first half of the book is concerned with a nip by account of the author's life with lawrence and the majestic Frieda in Mexico -- sight-seeing expeditions, dinners, houses, acquaintances, and of course, the natives. Though it seems impossible for any intimate of Lawrence's to release himself from the sense of obligating departed , this analysis of Lawrence as a man, a prophet, and an artist in unusually objective. In the second half of the book Lawrence's use of myth, sex, his often misunderstood ""heroic"" social theorizing, an artistic conflict between ""mission"" and art, are discussed sympathetically, but incisively. A disturbing, exciting portrait of genius by a poet who recaptures the flavor of the ancient culture within which Lawrence hoped to find his lost gods. A thrilling addition to the Lawrence studies.

Publisher: John Day