PRESIDENT AND CONGRESS by W.K. Binkley

PRESIDENT AND CONGRESS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A comprehensive survey of the relationship of the President and Congress to ""put to rest a great deal of loose chatter as to what is what and what is not constitutional"". This, with considerable source and reference material, shows the authority of the Executive, the pattern of administration, through the successive terms where either Executive -- or Legislature- was stronger, and as issues and controversies challenged and changed the nature of government. From Washington, through the Federalists and the status of the political party, to their decline and the rise of the Jeffersonian Republicanism; the Jacksonian Revolution, and the veto first used as a means of party warfare; the emergence of a strong executive -- and by 1850- of a two party system; Lincoln, and the reaction after his death; the ineptitude of Grant; Congressional party government with Harrison; and finally the leadership of McKinley, the ""tribunes of the people""- the two Roosevelts and Wilson who translated public feelings into legislative enactments and governmental policies... This is a revision of a book entitled ""The Powers of the President."" The market is largely for students of political history and science.

Pub Date: March 20th, 1947
Publisher: Knopf