MY BROTHER AMERICANS by

MY BROTHER AMERICANS

By
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KIRKUS REVIEW

Frankly, this seems to be a scissors and paste job, done to fill a gap before he can write a ""Return to the Philippines"" -- and riding to reasonable popularity on Romulo's personal sclat It is the record of his stay between the Fall and the invasion, and it charts the process of disillusionment, then faith in America reborn, as he talks to people everywhere, -- on trains, in factories, training camps, schools, colleges, before club groups, rotaries, etc., etc. Everywhere he finds people friendly, generous, never letting him feel himself an alien. He comments on the extensive development of club life he tells of excesses of hospitality, of experiences on lecture platforms, with program committees, on bond drives, and so on. He finds everywhere links between America and . And he falls for the American vice of collecting souvenirs. No particular social significance, though he comments on labor problems, on remoteness from the actual war, on his realization of race tensions, on the press, the War Department, and so on...An unimportant book which keeps a popular Filipino before the public eye.

Pub Date: June 21st, 1945
Publisher: Doubleday, Doran