SEVENTY THOUSAND MILES OF WAR by W.W. Chaplin

SEVENTY THOUSAND MILES OF WAR

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A war book that is different, fined down -- it attempts no economic survey, no dramatic, bloody descriptions, no schemes of reorganization. The story of a modern Gulliver in pre-war France, the Pacific areas, the American production fronts; he capitalizes on his journalistic instinct for human-interest and most of his anecdotes pack a wallop not only because they give one the feeling of each country, but because they are told in a simple, dry, anti-climactic sort of style. His aim is to tell little typical things which give an insight into the causes of war; he visited the Maginot Line and the fortress of Verdun, he attended the Viceroy of India's Fourth of July party; he heard first-hand stories of the Burma campaign and the Doolittle raid on Tokyo; he interviewed Gandhi and Nehru, leaving vivid thumbnail impressions and some personal opinions; he describes such places as Bagdad and Karachi with almost a Lewis Carroll kind of whimsy. Nearly one third of the book is devoted to Russia. He got inside stories of Guerilla bands, the food situation, Russian secretiveness, preparedness, realism and discipline, and he draws some conclusions as to her postwar attitude. A fast-moving I-was-there-behind-the-news sort of book, with an authentic note. Good reading.

Pub Date: Nov. 19th, 1943
Publisher: Appleton-Century