ANATOLIAN TALES by Yashar Kemal

ANATOLIAN TALES

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

Seven skillful short stories from Turkey passionate with outrage at the (apparently) contemporary lot of oppressed rural peasants, a matter handsomely aired in the-author's novel Memed My Hawk (1961). The longest story, ""The Drumming-out,"" concerns the efforts of a newly minted Commissioner to protect wretched villagers against the rapacious practices of ""feudal"" rice planters, his ignominious removal and final moral victory which hints of Ultimate triumphs. There are somber, moving sketches of violence and misery--a hideously violated girl reunited with her simple, patient husband; a widower wandering helplessly from village to village with his dying baby; an exploited youngster who dreams of white trousers; an accusing, mute boy who stands in judgment over a corrupt shopkeeper. And there are two appealing stories of love and homecoming in which fortune is a ripe plum falling suddenly through sameness and arid spaces. In the tradition of Gogol and Singer, Kemal's anger at injustice and betrayal proceeds directly from a lyrical appreciation of people and places.

Pub Date: Aug. 18th, 1969
Publisher: Dodd Mead