DAUGHTER OF THE PACIFIC by Yoko Matauoka

DAUGHTER OF THE PACIFIC

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Yoko Matauoka had the good fortune to be born some thirty-five years ago to parents with liberal, westernized ideas. Her father worked on the Osaka newspaper, and her mother, a serious woman, did things like urging Yoko to read Dontoevaky and Shakespeare. In her youth, she relates, the old Japanese legends and teachings seemed unreal and lacking in imagination and so through her following years of School in Seoul, a journey to Manchuria, life in Japan, and many years spent as a student of political science at Swarthmore, she looks at Japan and the Japanese way of life with critical eyes. But potentially valuable material is swamped in a welter of personal detail and long winded anecodotes. The author's virtue and often unmistakable prudery seem to prevent a true understanding of her own people, to make extraordinary rather than ordinary her valuable learning and adoption of Christian principles. Hardly worth more than a dipping into.

Pub Date: Feb. 13th, 1952
Publisher: Harper