Young Adult Book Reviews (page 1284)

WHAT GOOD IS A TAIL? by Dorothy Hinshaw Patent
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Index. (Nonfiction. 9-12)"
A reliable author/photographer team collaborates on another winning book—somewhat easier to read than their Feathers (1992)- -with a lively text, appealing color photos, and intriguing science facts showing just how useful a tail can be. Read full book review >
HANDS AROUND LINCOLN SCHOOL by Frank Asch
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"A nice, simple school story for not-so-simple times. (Fiction. 9-12)"
When Amy (the narrator) and three other sixth graders form a ``Save the Earth'' club, Amy is the reluctant one: membership means making presentations in classrooms and, ultimately, performing on stage in front of her school. Read full book review >

HOSTILITIES by Caroline Macdonald
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"1991). (Fiction/Short stories. 11-13)"
A delicately macabre ambience infuses these tales from the Australian author of Speaking To Miranda (1992): a fugitive finds the story of her own life in an old book; a boy visiting his aunt's dying farm is haunted by dreams centering around ``The Dam'' and its fetid lake; ``The Thief in the Rocks'' and another malevolent spirit infecting ``The Greenhouse'' behave with chilling malice. Read full book review >
WOMEN AND WAR by Fiona Reynoldson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Books to Read''; sources of quotes (without page numbers); index. (Nonfiction. 10- 14)"
In Thomson's World War II series, one of several topical volumes sampling experiences in different countries. Read full book review >
THE CIRCLEMAKER by Maxine Rose Schur
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"The genuinely evoked setting and circumstances and the plucky boy's narrow escapes compel attention; the fact that he's last seen boarding a ship, penniless but hoping to find an aunt in New York, suggests a sequel. (Fiction. 9-12)"
When his astonished enemy Dovid, a bully who tormented him back in their Russian village, asks why Mendel has risked his life to save Dovid's, Mendel—trying to fathom his own motives- -can only reply, ``I had to close a circle.'' He is recalling his father's words: ``All growing things live and die in a circle...My knowledge is part of a circle from my grandfather...to me...and now to you...it is when you give that you gain power...Only then do you become a circlemaker.'' At 12, Mendel has fled from the forcible induction of Jewish boys into the czar's army; by coincidence, one of the men who helps him toward the Hungarian border pairs him with Dovid—who has just escaped from the army—for the journey's last leg. Read full book review >

FLIP-FLOP GIRL by Katherine Paterson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Touching, engrossing, beautifully wrought. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Paterson writes of today's gritty reality in an easily read story about a fourth grader whose father's death has thrown her family out of balance. Read full book review >
LOBSTERS by Mary M. Cerullo
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Bibliography; index. (Nonfiction. 10-14)"
All about the crustacean ``called `the gangster of the sea' because it is aggressive and territorial by nature'': its anatomy, life cycle, courtship, and breeding; and about lobstering: its history and lore, trapping, and marketing. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"B&w photos; source notes; index. (Biography. 11-15)"
Mendilow was an enterprising, compassionate native Israeli who founded and directed a network of craft workshops and social service programs for the elderly residents of Jerusalem; by providing them with meaningful work, congenial companionship, and a wide range of cultural programs and medical and dental care, between 1961 and her death in 1989 she improved the lives of countless individuals. Read full book review >
LAND OF DREAMS by Joan Lowery Nixon
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Still, a readable novel that makes an accessible introduction to its period setting. (Fiction. 10-14)"
In the third in Nixon's Ellis Island series, Kristin Swenson and her parents settle on a Minnesota farm, in a house Mamma fears is haunted by former occupants. Read full book review >
JACKSON JONES AND THE PUDDLE OF THORNS by Mary Quattlebaum
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Illustrations not seen. (Fiction. 9-12)"
Jackson Jones is a true-blue city kid, down to the soles of his Nike Air Jordans; he loves apartment life, shooting hoops, and writing comic books with best buddy Reuben Casey. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"B&w photos; chronology; notes; further reading plus nine videos; index. (Biography. 11-16)"
In the People to Know series, an awkward account of the life of a thoughtful and eminent Holocaust survivor whose life has been dedicated to keeping memory of the Holocaust alive lest it be repeated. Read full book review >
THE MASTER BUILDERS by Philip Wilkinson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Palatable lessons on history, anthropology, and architecture. (Nonfiction. 11-14)"
One of four entries in the Mysterious Places series— simplified versions of Wilkinson's Encyclopedia of Mysterious Places; others are The Magical East; The Mediterranean; and The Lands of the Bible). Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >