2016 Nominees: nonfiction (page 2)

THE CONSTITUTION TODAY by Akhil Reed Amar
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Bringing an unusually informed and cool head to the tumult accompanying unfolding events, Amar performs a valuable service for his fellow citizens."
From a constitutional law expert, 20 years' worth of essays on controversial issues that have dominated the headlines. Read full book review >
WE GON' BE ALRIGHT by Jeff Chang
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations."
In this collection, written "in appreciation of all the young people who would not bow down," outspoken journalist Chang (Who We Be: A Cultural History of Race in Post-Civil Rights America, 2014, etc.) offers six critical essays addressing racial inequality and inequity and how these provocative, multifaceted issues impact virtually every culture. Read full book review >
IF VENICE DIES by Salvatore Settis
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"An impassioned plea that every lover of Venice, urban planner, architect, and cultural historian should read."
Archaeologist and art historian Settis (The Future of the Classical, 2006, etc.) explores how troubled Venice is capable of being the true vision of a city. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"An elaborately detailed, darkly surprising, definitive history of the LA gangsta rap era."
A provocative, multifaceted portrait of essential rap pioneers who ushered the hip-hop music scene to greatness. Read full book review >
GIRL by Alona Frankel
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 12, 2016

"A truly moving and bravely rendered memoir."
An impressionistic memoir of a Polish Jewish girl's survival hiding as a Gentile in Nazi-occupied Poland. Read full book review >
POWER AT GROUND ZERO by Lynne Sagalyn
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 9, 2016

"The narrative's sheer bulk will likely intimidate some readers, and that would be a shame, because Sagalyn has produced a definitive history and an urban studies classic."
A superbly qualified scholar thoroughly deconstructs the tortured story behind the rebuilding of the World Trade Center complex. Read full book review >
Such Mad Fun by Robin Cutler
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 8, 2016

"A valuable, absorbing contribution to the history of women, golden-age Hollywood, and America's magazine culture of the 1930s and '40s."
A biography of Jane Hall, a writer for magazines and movies, traces the complicated, warring pressures of talent and the feminine mystique. Read full book review >
WHAT THE LUCK? by Gary Smith
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"A welcome, widely applicable follow-up to the author's equally useful first book."
Another delightful addition to the stuff-you-think-you-know-that's-wrong genre, á la Freakonomics, Outliers, and The Black Swan. Read full book review >
THE ART OF WAITING by Belle Boggs
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"In her reporting, researching, and sharing, Boggs has performed a public service for those in a similar position—and for anyone interested in the implications of parenthood or in a story well-told and deeply felt."
So much more than a memoir about trying to conceive. Read full book review >
FAMILY OF EARTH by Wilma Dykeman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"A captivating, poetic, difficult-to-categorize book that abundantly showcases the author's talent for making words dance. Anyone who has lived in the countryside, or wished they had, will enjoy Dykeman's celebration of nature."
The first publication of a long-lost work by revered Appalachian writer Dykeman (1920-2006). Read full book review >
WEAPONS OF MATH DESTRUCTION by Cathy O'Neil
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"An unusually lucid and readable look at the daunting algorithms that govern so many aspects of our lives."
How ill-conceived algorithms now micromanage America's economy, from advertising to prisons. Read full book review >
AMERICAN REVOLUTIONS by Alan Taylor
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"Beautifully organized and accessibly presented history for all readers."
A clear, authoritative, well-organized look at the messy Colonial march toward revolution and self-rule. Read full book review >

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ABOUT THE KIRKUS PRIZE

The Kirkus Prize is one of the richest literary awards in the world, with a prize of $50,000 bestowed annually to authors of fiction, nonfiction and young readers’ literature. It was created to celebrate the 81 years of discerning, thoughtful criticism Kirkus Reviews has contributed to both the publishing industry and readers at large. Books that earned the Kirkus Star with publication dates between November 1, 2015, and October 31, 2016 (see FAQ for exceptions), are automatically nominated for the 2016 Kirkus Prize, and the winners will be selected on November 3, 2016, by an esteemed panel composed of nationally respected writers and highly regarded booksellers, librarians and Kirkus critics.