Books to Discover

Released: July 25, 2014

"Far more than just a paint-by-numbers story of a small town."
In Halverson's debut novel, a mysterious mural appears overnight on the side of a building in an Arizona town, sparking a range of emotions and examinations of life. Read full book review >
Released: April 5, 2012

"Witty and engaging, this short novel will provide readers a dose of hilarity and a quick cure for the workaday blues."
The laugh-out-loud tale of how a hapless accountant endures a three-day coma in the company of another soul in limbo, observing the gritty, often bizarre goings-on of an inner-city emergency room. Read full book review >

Released: Feb. 10, 2013

"A dead-on satire—with a heart—of the reality TV scene from a knowledgeable, witty insider."
When a long-running documentary series is cancelled, the show's filmmakers must navigate a new reality TV landscape in this satiric novel. Read full book review >
The Girl on the Pier by Paul Tomkins
Released: Jan. 28, 2015

"Beautiful and chilling—a brilliant debut.
In Tomkins' (Dynasty: Fifty Years of Shankly's Liverpool, 2013, etc.) novel, a forensic artist's romantic obsessions and traumatic past rise to the surface as he works on a cold case.Read full book review >
Released: Feb. 8, 2012

"A superb tale of the druggie lifestyle, by a writer with talent to burn."
Young drug dealers cope with love, loss and voracious smack habits in this scintillating saga of Chicago's lowlife demimonde. Read full book review >

Released: June 18, 2014

"Swashbuckling tales for young readers that could bring smiles for older readers, too."
A pair of remarkable youngsters—one disguising his age, the other disguising her sex and age—participates in significant battles of the American Revolution and meets many of the chief architects of the American Experiment. Read full book review >
Released: April 17, 2014

"The fulfilling story of a young man who can turn trash into treasure."
Tully's debut novel concerns the coming-of-age of a teenage boy in suburban Cleveland. Read full book review >
Released: April 24, 2014

"An important, accessible take on understanding autism spectrum disorder."
In this debut children's book, a young bunny and his parents deal with his diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder. Read full book review >
Released: Dec. 1, 2014

"Mars needs milk in this tongue-in-cheek, slam-bang bit of YA escapism that's best for members of the PlayStation-playing generation."
In LeVasseur's debut middle-grade sci-fi novel, a friendly extraterrestrial girl whisks a Nebraska farm boy away for a wild adventure of Martian intrigue, rebellion and invasion. Read full book review >

"A funny, exciting novel for young readers that's likely to find many fans."
A middle-grade debut fantasy-adventure novel about a student with a knack for getting in trouble. Read full book review >
ARRGH! by Stacey R. Campbell
Released: Nov. 1, 2014

"A satisfying, well-told story of an orphan boy who escapes the clutches of his pirate abductors, proves himself courageous and finds the real treasure of family."
A high-seas middle-grade adventure about an orphan captured by pirates who befriends a talking mouse. Read full book review >
Released: Feb. 5, 2015

"With a touch of sci-fi, this penultimate installation of a fantasy series delivers rich characters and complex plotlines."
In this second installment of O'Connor's (Silevethiel, 2013, etc.) YA fantasy series, a young man, fighting to save the world, is tested when an old adversary returns to wreak more destruction. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jason Gay
November 17, 2015

In the 1990s, copies of Richard Carlson’s Don't Sweat the Small Stuff (and its many sequels) were seemingly everywhere, giving readers either the confidence to prioritize their stresses or despondence over the slender volume’s not addressing their particular set of problems. While not the first book of its kind, it kicked open the door for an industry of self-help, worry-reduction advice guides. In his first book, Little Victories, Wall Street Journal sports columnist Gay takes less of a guru approach, though he has drawn an audience of readers appreciative of reportage that balances insights with a droll, self-deprecating outlook. He occasionally focuses his columns on “the Rules” (of Thanksgiving family touch football, the gym, the office holiday party, etc.), which started as a genial poke in the eye at the proliferation of self-help books and, over time, came to explore actual advice “both practical and ridiculous” and “neither perfect nor universal.” The author admirably combines those elements in every piece in the book. View video >