Search Results: "Digital Leaf"


BOOK REVIEW

LEAF by Sandra  Dieckmann
Released: Oct. 3, 2017

"Dieckmann beautifully weaves together some of today's most difficult themes into a deceptively simple tale. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A lost polar bear strikes fear into the woodland animals until his extraordinary efforts to return home bring help, hope, and understanding. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LEAF by Stephen Michael King
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2009

"Wonderful squiggly line, patches of green and brown, gold and blue and fabulous use of negative white space make this a joy to reread. (Picture book. 5-9)"
A curious, curiously subversive and very pretty wordless Australian import. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MOO SAID MORRIS by Jon Lycett-Smith
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 11, 2014

"Though the interactive features are nondescript, this sweet, simple story may spur a valuable conversation or two about nonconformity. (Requires iOS 6 and above.) (iPad storybook app. 3-6)"
This tiny tale about individuality aims to encourage kids to be exactly who they are—without apology. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LEAF MAGIC by Margaret Mahy
Released: Sept. 1, 1977

"Frail whimsey, with a pseudopoint—and weak, washed-out pictures to match."
Running home through the autumn woods, Michael wishes for a dog; but what he gets instead is a giant orange leaf which follows him everywhere. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 23, 1971

"The author's imagination, as always, is a closetful of wonders, and Gregory Rabassa's translation, as before, is virtually invisible."
Garcia Marquez returns to stir the dust of Macondo, his personal Caribbean fiefdom, which God and the banana company have apparently "declared unnecessary and thrown into a corner." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHAT WILL I BE? by Richard Sinclair
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 27, 2013

"Despite meaningless distractions, a happy story full of possibilities. (iPad storybook app. 3-6)"
A cheery story tells children that they can be whatever they want to be. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: July 1, 1997

"The tone of disregard notwithstanding, this is, for the most part, a fun read with generally positive implications for the audiovisual arts. (illustrations, not seen)"
This study of the impact of emerging technologies on the arts is instructive and informative, but lapses into elitist ramblings by its end. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LEAF BY LEAF by Barbara Rogasky
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"Despite the occasional difficulty in reading the text over the pictures, Henley's quote could apply to these lovely images. (Poetry. 5-9)"
There's a marvelous sense of composition to this attractive volume: the pictures and the poetry are tightly bound together in image and evocation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RED LEAF, YELLOW LEAF by Lois Ehlert
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1991

"An outstanding example of early nonfiction that is not only visually striking but also informative and scrupulously accurate. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A simple narrative celebrating a child's pleasure in a sugar maple—its prepurchase history, its changing appearance during the year, planting, growth—is extended with excellent notes on the tree's parts as well as lucid instructions for planting and caring for it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"Meandering and erratic; rarely imparts any meaningful understanding of the topic it covers."
Another peek inside the unfolding universe of the World Wide Web. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 19, 2015

"Readers may not be any less confused about the actual workings of Bitcoin, which remain murky, when finished with this book, but they will certainly know enough to make intelligent choices about whether to buy in or steer clear."
In which all that glitters is not gold—but the usual crowd of crooks and speculators is still part of the package. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 5, 2013

"A valuable addition to the literature on the digital age."
A provocative and far-reaching account of how capitalism has shaped the Internet in the United States. Read full book review >