Search Results: "See Here Studios"


BOOK REVIEW

FAM BAM by See Here Studios
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 24, 2012

"Not the most inventive tale, but an earnest one that addresses the idea of respecting others' musical palates. Brandy fans will love it. (iPad storybook app. 3-6)"
Rhythm-and-blues singer Brandy Norwood joins her brother and parents to tell an animated story about competing musical tastes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE THREE PANDAS by Valerie Mih
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 23, 2011

"But the design is clever, and the visuals (along with the unfailingly adorable pandas themselves) make it worth a look. (iPad storybook app. 2-7)"
A modern take on "Goldilocks and the Three Bears" features a charming style of animation and a lovable family of pandas. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TORTOISE AND THE HARE: REMATCH by Wallace E. Keller
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 28, 2012

"Overall, perseverance, patience and good sportsmanship rule the day in this colorful sequel. (iPad storybook app. 4-7)"
Does slow and steady still win the race? In this extended version of the timeless children's tale, there's a hare more to the story...and to the answer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I SEE A PATTERN HERE by Bruce Goldstone
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 10, 2015

"A solid resource for both introducing and reinforcing patterns. (Informational picture book. 7-10)"
Goldstone tackles slides, turns, flips and folds in his latest, a look at patterning. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

10 THINGS I CAN SEE FROM HERE by Carrie Mac
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"With Maeve, Mac delivers a character who's heartwarmingly real and sympathetic, and her story provides a much needed mirror for anxious queer girls everywhere. (Fiction. 14 & up)"
A white teen with severe anxiety struggles to manage her mental health and finds joy in a budding relationship with a new girlfriend. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 12, 2002

"A good and leathery year abroad, an honest and deeply enjoyed experience that avoids skimming off only the fruity bonbons while neglecting the ruck of daily life."
A French village, a good restaurant, and a year's worth of time to spend in both add stock to the lives of Sanders and his family. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SANTA COW STUDIOS by Cooper Edens
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"A good book for those with a cow fetish or fans of the previous titles; not to everyone's taste. (Picture book. 4-8)"
The Santa Cows (Santa Cows, 1991, etc.) return to give the Schwartz family a tour of Hollywood, playing out spoofs of familiar movies—Star Cows, Cowsablanca, and Jurassic Cows—and ending up in an extended parody: It's an Udderful Life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HERE by Elizabeth Inness-Brown
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1994

"Short fiction of an emerging polish, varyingly arresting."
Inness-Brown debuts with stories that seem to be pecking and tapping to hatch from the confining egg of practice exercises. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HERE by Richard McGuire
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 9, 2014

"A gorgeous symphony."
Illustrator McGuire (What's Wrong With This Book, 1997, etc.) once again frames a fixed space across the millennia.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HERE COMES THE TOOTH FAIRY CAT by Deborah Underwood
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 19, 2015

"Clever fun continues in this delightful series. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Mischievous Cat is back (Here Comes Santa Cat, 2014, etc.), this time determined to meet the Tooth Fairy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I SEE AND SEE by Ted Lewin
by Ted Lewin, illustrated by Ted Lewin
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2016

"A useful instructional addition for beginning readers who need to experience success. (Picture book/early reader. 3-6)"
The latest entry in the I Like to Read series involves very little reading. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SEE THROUGH by Nelly Reifler
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

"With her strong New York literary scene connections (as Paul Auster's assistant and coeditor) and her obvious talent, Reifler is bound to receive serious attention for these chiseled tales."
Fourteen stories range from photographically realistic to Kafkaesque, as newcomer Reifler casts an unflinching eye on the damage caused by the imperfect morality of her characters, adult and child both. Read full book review >