Search Results: "Small Planet Digital"


BOOK REVIEW

DRAGON BRUSH by John  Solimine
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 23, 2012

"With its distinctive look, a great drawing element that's actually appropriate to the story and a moral that values cleverness over power, Bing-Wen's app is as rare and magical as the dragons he loves to paint. (iPad storybook app. 3-8)"
The story of a magical dragon brush that can bring painted objects to life casts its own spell. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 19, 2015

"Readers may not be any less confused about the actual workings of Bitcoin, which remain murky, when finished with this book, but they will certainly know enough to make intelligent choices about whether to buy in or steer clear."
In which all that glitters is not gold—but the usual crowd of crooks and speculators is still part of the package. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 5, 2013

"A valuable addition to the literature on the digital age."
A provocative and far-reaching account of how capitalism has shaped the Internet in the United States. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"A genial guide to this brave new world of Napster and Netscape."
An economist describes and assesses for the lay reader the varieties of current e-market models and speculates about the future of e-commerce. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BEING DIGITAL by Nicholas Negroponte
NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 3, 1995

"Negroponte brings decades of experience to his subject, but it's all for naught; his book is a muddle of retread cyber-hype and familiar predictions, relieved only by occasional flashes of original insight. (First printing of 100,000; Book-of-the-Month Club selection; author tour)"
Negroponte—founder of MIT's groundbreaking Media Lab—offers a brief, rambling survey of the digitization of culture that's not nearly as original as one might expect. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"Meandering and erratic; rarely imparts any meaningful understanding of the topic it covers."
Another peek inside the unfolding universe of the World Wide Web. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SMALL by Clara Vulliamy
ANIMALS
Released: March 18, 2002

"While not especially inspired, this is a warm tribute to the relationship of children with their toys. (Picture book. 2-5)"
A lot of things are needed for his first sleepover, and Tom packs and repacks his little suitcase trying to find room for it all; but has he forgotten an important item? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: July 1, 1997

"The tone of disregard notwithstanding, this is, for the most part, a fun read with generally positive implications for the audiovisual arts. (illustrations, not seen)"
This study of the impact of emerging technologies on the arts is instructive and informative, but lapses into elitist ramblings by its end. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 22, 2012

"Occasionally insightful but tiresome and scattershot."
An Internet entrepreneur and critic rails against the inexorable growth of social media. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 8, 2007

"Complex, quixotic attempt to sway the American public from the temptation to 'amuse itself to death.'"
A sobering view of today's entrenched corporate media giants as a threat to the concept of an enlightened electorate. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 23, 1996

"An authoritative and enlightening survey of what the future might hold for those who engage in combat on America's behalf."
Hard on the heels of a widely publicized GAO report charging that the Pentagon oversold the high-tech weapons used during the 1991 Gulf War comes an informative, down-to-earth assessment of what arms the US military could and should bear in the years ahead. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: July 1, 2007

"A smart introduction to philanthropy in the digital age."
Technology is transforming philanthropy. Read full book review >