Search Results: "The New York Times"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 11, 2002

"An excellent job of synthesizing the many voices made available through the newspaper to form a coherent and forceful narrative. (16 pp. b&w insert, not seen)"
The planes came out of the blue, but their intentions were long in the making as New York Times reporter Bernstein (Dictatorship of Virtue, 1994, etc.) explicates in this taut narrative of the events, personalities, and circumstances surrounding the attacks of September 11, 2001. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 14, 2013

"American history meets the 'snap, crackle and pop of lively online writing' in this outstanding serialization."
Widmer, a Brown University historian, is joined by New York Times op-ed staff editors Risen and Kalogerakis in the masterful compilation of more than 100 short essays based on the award-winning Times Disunion blog (begun in 2010), which chronologically traces and reconsiders the War between the States, an event he believes still remains "a ghostly presence in American life." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"A first choice for those who want an illustrated overview. (Nonfiction. 8-12)"
Taken from its own coverage of the events of September 11th and their aftermath, New York Times editors have adapted a Young Reader's Edition from their adult title of the same name. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 12, 2001

"A clear, readable, fascinating overview of the tools and gadgets of the modern world."
The subtitle tells the story of this collection of technology columns from the New York Times. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE <i>NEW YORK TIMES</i> DISUNION by Ted Widmer
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 3, 2016

"An excellent teaching tool, perfect for libraries."
Noted academics, scholars, editors, and historians contribute to a collection of fresh, provocative essays on the Civil War, first published in digital form by the New York Times. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 31, 2011

"An important book that gives coherence to a massive data dump."
Thoughtful analysis of one of the largest leaks of classified information in history—how it happened, what the secret documents say and what it all means. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 11, 1994

"Perhaps Cuomo's future campaign committee will buy and distribute this book; it has little other purpose."
An odd, self-serving mix—part New York handbook, part explanation of recent state initiatives, part future campaign manifesto—from New York's governor (Diaries of Mario M. Cuomo, 1984). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 1, 2003

"More self-consciously literary than its predecessor, but still some valuable gleanings."
An uneven second collection of essays on writing from the New York Times. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"History doesn't get easier to take than this."
Top-notch compilation celebrating 200 years of New York City news as seen in the pages of the New York Post, with half-tones and line art throughout. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE NEW YORK YANQUIS by Bill Granger
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 6, 1995

"Granger's fable never quite lives up to the antic promise of its imaginative premise."
Granger (Drover and the Designated Hitter, 1994, etc.) takes time out from his Drover and November Man series to offer a plodding, talky baseball fantasy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE NEW YORK FOUR by Brian Wood
FICTION
Released: July 2, 2008

"A natural transition for maturing readers of The P.L.A.I.N. Janes and The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants. (Graphic fiction. YA)"
An aloof college freshman learns about life in this subdued tale of post-adolescent angst. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 20, 1993

"A wonderful book. (Sixty-six photographs, drawings, and floor plans)"
Hawes's fine book, her first, employs architectural criticism, economic chronicle, and urban sociology to create a picture of how Manhattan turned from a series of pastures broken by single-family dwellings into a breathtaking erector set of multiple dwellings: a shift to modernity as a reliable indicator of ``the workings of the urban mind.'' Prior to 1869, anyone who didn't have to live communally in a single building certainly never would. Read full book review >