Search Results: "Yu Hua"


BOOK REVIEW

TO LIVE by Yu Hua
by Yu Hua, translated by Michael Berry
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 3, 2003

"Yu Hua is an internationally celebrated author, but this English version of his work doesn't tell us why."
A Chinese Everyman's progress from self-indulgent irresponsibility to resignation and the beginning of wisdom is briskly in a 1993 novel known in other parts of the world as the source of the highly successful film. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHINA IN TEN WORDS by Yu Hua
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 8, 2011

"More engaging than profound, Yu Hua's essays say much about the continuing enigma that is China."
Acclaimed Chinese novelist Yu Hua (Brothers, 2010, etc.) offers a series of essays that combine memoir and trenchant social critique. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CRIES IN THE DRIZZLE by Yu Hua
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 9, 2007

"A grainy montage of suffering and survival, by turns morbid and mordant."
Now in English translation, the 1991 novel by bestselling Chinese author Yu Hua (To Live, 2003). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SEVENTH DAY by Yu Hua
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 13, 2015

"Compelling moments and black humor go some way toward relieving the lugubrious funk of this episodic work, which might adapt well as a one-man show for John Leguizamo but falls short of being a fully realized novel."
In this melancholy view of the afterlife, dying without a burial place leaves a man in limbo, where he revisits his life through memories and the spirits he encounters. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BOY IN THE TWILIGHT by Yu Hua
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 21, 2014

"Menacing vignettes from a crowded, hardhearted corner of the globe."
Thirteen new translations of stories by one of China's most outspoken critics of the Cultural Revolution. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BROTHERS by Yu Hua
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 27, 2009

"A deeply flawed great novel, akin to the best work of Zola, Louis-Ferdinand Céline and, arguably, Rabelais."
The lives of two stepbrothers, temperamental opposites nevertheless sworn to love and protect each other, are traced, in exuberant and exhausting detail, in this massive novel, originally published in Taiwan in two volumes in 2005 and 2006. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHIN YU MIN AND THE GINGER CAT by Jennifer Armstrong
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1993

"GrandPrÇ debuts with illustrations that glow with warmth, grace, and humor; her distinctive style features striking exaggerations of perspective and expression, plus an intense palette centered on red-purple and tawny orange. (Picture book. 6-10)"
Reduced to penury, the conceited widow of a Chinese official adopts an elegant cat that can catch fish with his tail. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 16, 2013

"A suspect, although thought-provoking, alternative to Western-style wellness treatments that may contain the kernels of good advice."
A modern-day proponent of ancient Taoism provides a regimen that aims to dramatically extend one's life span. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A LOVELY DAY FOR AMELIA GOOSE by Yu Rong
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 2004

"A sunny tale to share with members of the diapered set who aren't yet up to the emotional Sturm und Drang of Jane Simmons's Daisy or Lucy Cousins's Maisy. (Picture book. 2-4)"
Amelia Goose rises from her cozy bed, strolls outside to greet the bees and birds (they answer back, cheerily), plays in the pond with Frog until bedtime, and then retires. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE REMOTE COUNTRY OF WOMEN by Bai Hua
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 1994

"A lyrical work, both tragic and uplifting."
Two people's vastly different experiences during the Cultural Revolution are the subject of this beautiful, sad novel by an internationally renowned Chinese writer and dissident not previously published in English. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Feb. 1, 2005

"For a similar audience as Ji-Li Jiang's Red Scarf Girl (1997), readers will find Chun Yu's autobiographical story a completely different reading experience, and will appreciate this debut of a vivid and lyrical voice. (Fiction. 10-adult)"
Born the year that the Cultural Revolution started, Little Green bore witness through her entire childhood to this terrible time in China's history. Read full book review >