Search Results: "Éric Chevillard"


BOOK REVIEW

THE AUTHOR AND ME by Éric Chevillard
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"A curious, cleverly constructed matryoshka doll of unreliable narrators."
An attempt to map the distance between novelist and character goes awry in this peculiar, funny and intellectually rich romp by Chevillard (On the Ceiling, 2000, etc.).Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ON THE CEILING by Éric Chevillard
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 28, 2000

"Ezra Pound, who urged artists to 'make it new,' might have detected a rare (and rarefied) kindred spirit in the waggish—and alarmingly inventive—M. Chevillard."
Both logic and conventional romantic and family relations are blithely subverted in this droll 1997 fable by Chevillard, the popular French author whose earlier novel, The Crab Nebula (1998), has also appeared in English translation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LITTLE MOUSE'S BIG SECRET by Éric Battut
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2011

"Even the tree at its tallest stays tranquilly centered mid-right, leaving plenty of creamy yellow background to showcase the largeness of the world from a child's-eye view and how easy it is to focus on the most important thing in that world. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Young readers will thrill at being one step ahead of a protagonist who isn't quite so cunning as he thinks he is. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BUREAU OF MISPLACED DADS by Éric Veillé
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2015

"Readers may leave this book wishing their own parental units might be 'misplaced,' if only so that they can visit this bureau. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A gently surreal tale of a boy who must sift through throngs of abandoned fathers while on the hunt for his own. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PIANO PIANO by Davide Cali
by Davide Cali, illustrated by Éric Heliot, translated by Randi Rivers
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2007

"Though framed as a tale for emergent readers, this actually has more to say to parents with selective memory who might be disinclined to give their children's preferences sufficient weight. (Picture book. 6-8)"
Thanks to some grandfatherly intervention, young Marcolino avoids the hated piano to practice a more agreeable instrument in this pointed import. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LITTLE PEA by Éric Battut
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2011

"Young children often have outsized ambitions; here is a tale of one little one who literally roots his dreams in the ground, with a beautiful result. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A clean design featuring loads of white space surrounding bright spot illustrations makes this story of a little pea with big ambitions stand out. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHADOW RITUAL by Éric Giacometti
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 25, 2015

"Though far from subtle, Giacometti and Ravenne's series kickoff has abundant visceral appeal."
An international odd couple tracks a cabal of neo-Nazi assassins. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY PICTURES AFTER THE STORM by Éric Veillé
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2017

"Droll, imagination-stretching ways to get from here to there, from this to that, from now to later. (Picture book. 5-8)"
A whimsical series of before-and-after images, from the author of The Bureau of Misplaced Dads (illustrated by Pauline Martin, 2015). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE INK DRINKER by Éric Sanvoisin
by Éric Sanvoisin, translated by Georges Moroz, illustrated by Martin Matje
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"Matje's inspired, eccentric illustrations recall the styles of Tomi Ungerer and Edward Gorey. (Fiction. 7-10)"
The story of an ink-drinking vampire, and the boy who discovers his nefarious behavior. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

WHEN CHAOS REIGNS
by Julie Danielson

As I’ve said many times here at Kirkus, I love to follow picture book imports, and one thing I appreciate about them is the amount of chaos they’re willing to let in. If you live in America and primarily write about picture books from this country, as I do, along comes an import, and it’s often an altogether different beast ...


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