Search Results: "A.J. Zerries"


BOOK REVIEW

STEALING FROM THE DEAD by A.J. Zerries
Released: Aug. 21, 2012

"Zerries (The Lost Van Gogh, 2006) keeps both great matters and small moving along smartly courtesy of what may be New York's toughest female cop."
An NYPD detective incongruously juggles a gang of murderous swindlers whose ill-gotten gains are financing international terrorism and a more traditional kind of gang that operates considerably closer to the streets of New York. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EVEN MONSTERS... by A.J. Smith
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2014

"A humorous, somewhat unoriginal offering—for kids who prefer monsters to dinosaurs. (Picture book. 3-5)"
Who says monsters can only be frightful? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ZAC AND MIA by A.J. Betts
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 2, 2014

"Above average in this burgeoning subgenre; it's the healing powers of friendship, love and family that make this funny-yet-philosophical tale of brutal teen illness stand out. (Fiction. 14 & up)"
Desperate to reconnect with the outside world, teen bone marrow recipient Zac's very precise mind is distracted by the arrival of new cancer patient Mia in the 4-by-5-meter room next to his. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SPY HIGH by A.J. Butcher
ADVENTURE
Released: May 1, 2004

"First in a series. (Fiction. 12+)"
In this over-the-top secret-agent caper with a comic-book feel, six kids, each with a special talent and a psychological issue, are recruited to join a select training academy for secret agents. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"The casual distaste that many of the British display for the Jews (and, to a lesser extent, the Arabs) will discomfit many, but this is a readable version of the battle for Israeli independence from a perspective that will be unfamiliar to most Americans."
Sherman (Island Refuge: Britain and Refugees from the Third Reich, not reviewed) is uniquely positioned to write on the British experience of Palestine: Born in Jerusalem under the mandate, he is a lawyer and historian. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 7, 2006

"An engaging survey of interesting times."
Character sketches of movers and shakers—and even Quakers—who influenced the development of the postrevolutionary republic. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 10, 2012

"Unobtrusive reading material for your next trip on the treadmill."
The bestselling author of The Know-It-All (2004) and The Year of Living Biblically (2007) stretches the experiential journalist shtick to its limit with a cockamamie fitness quest to become the "healthiest man alive." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 9, 2010

"A disturbing reconsideration of a key period of history and a powerful indictment of its main actors."
In this history of the four decades preceding the Civil War, Langguth (Union 1812: The Americans Who Fought the Second War of Independence, 2006, etc.) argues that Andrew Jackson's handling of the Cherokees sowed the seeds of secession. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE EARL OF LOUISIANA by A.J. Liebling
Released: May 8, 1961

"It's a forceful and vital book and politically, more real than ll the King's Men."
Originally this book was a three-part profile in The New Yorker. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GOODIS by A.J. Thibault
Released: Nov. 1, 2007

"This proves most egregious in the ending, which should make any reader who has slogged through the entirety of this ambitiously plotted but poorly executed book feel cheated indeed."
Stumbling across the scene as Soviet agents sadistically slaughter an émigré physicist in Malibu Canyon launches a billionaire industrialist's son-and standup wannabe-on a Kafkaesque '80s odyssey that can't decide whether it's a thriller, love story, spy novel or social commentary. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MINK AND RED HERRING by A.J. Liebling
Released: June 23, 1949

"There's some pretty brilliant stuff here, which is very funny too, but one questions whether the no longer topical interest in many of the subjects scored may not limit the appeal of the volume."
Sub-titled "The Wayward Pressman's Casebook", these articles- all of which originally appeared in The New Yorker, comprise a fairly precise and perforating investigation of the infallibility of written words- in this case those of the press. Read full book review >