Search Results: "A.S. Byatt"


BOOK REVIEW

THE DJINN IN THE NIGHTINGALE'S EYE by A.S. Byatt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1997

Four short fairy tales with a contemporary edge, and one novella-length tale that brilliantly transforms a story of middle- age angst into a celebration of serendipity and sex. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BABEL TOWER by A.S. Byatt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1996

"Not Byatt's best."
An ambitious, intelligent work that, while aiming to get Britain's swinging '60s down pat, unfortunately scants the usual fictional elements, putting in their place a mordant and always perceptive historical critique. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 1, 2001

"The overall effect is somewhat slight and rather disjointed, but not without attraction."
Seven essays by novelist Byatt (The Biographer's Tale, 2000, etc.), all ostensibly linked by the motifs of writing and reading fiction set in the past. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ELEMENTALS by A.S. Byatt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1999

"An often enchanting further display of Byatt's fluent style and far-reaching imagination."
Six rather arbitrarily linked stories (which allegedly explore various "extremes and polarities") from the rococo stylist whose best fiction includes Booker Prize—winning Possession (1990) and the (rather similar) story collection The Djinn in the Nightingale's Eye (1997). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE OXFORD BOOK OF ENGLISH SHORT STORIES by A.S. Byatt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1998

"All in all, one of Oxford's best, and another feather in Byatt's richly decorated cap."
A solid collection of 37 stories, presumably intended to accompany an earlier volume edited by the late V.S. Pritchett. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CHILDREN’S BOOK by A.S. Byatt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 6, 2009

"Ambitious, accomplished and intelligent in the author's vintage manner."
Byatt (A Whistling Woman, 2002, etc.) encompasses the paradigm shift from Victorian to modern England in a sweeping tale of four families. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A WHISTLING WOMAN by A.S. Byatt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 17, 2002

"Not a perfect work, but an unarguably major one. Byatt's quartet is well worth the time and attention it demands."
The life of the mind and the confusions of the spirit confront one another to often telling effect in Byatt's lavishly orchestrated eighth novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MATISSE STORIES by A.S. Byatt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1995

"Byatt at her accessible—if rather brief—best."
Inspired by Matisse paintings, these three splendid stories (two have appeared in the New Yorker) pay homage to the artist as they offer equally memorable verbal portraits of apparently ordinary lives driven by pain and disquiet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANGELS AND INSECTS by A.S. Byatt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1993

"Dull and forced."
Two postmodern novellas with Victorian themes that have all the leaden scholarly pretension of that era—and none of the leavening irony that made Byatt's bestselling Possession (1990) so successful a mix of erudition and wit. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 17, 1997

"Byatt and Sodre attempt to bring out the knowledge that resides in art alone."
Two discriminating readers invite us to listen in on seven conversations about six important novels by women. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PEACOCK & VINE by A.S. Byatt
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"Although brief, this is an inspiring homage that forges illuminating connections between two dynamos."
An impassioned dual appreciation of two 19th-century creators who turned their lives into art. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RAGNAROK by A.S. Byatt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2012

"Though the cadences are like those of a fairy tale, a narrative seen through the eyes of a child, the chilling conclusion is not."
A multilayered retelling of the end of the world from Norse mythology, framed by the award-winning British novelist's analysis of how myth relates to her own work. Read full book review >