Search Results: "Aaron Cooley"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 7, 2012

"A Fleming-esque spy novel that keeps the story moving without ever losing its sense of fun."
A proto-James Bond thriller based loosely (very loosely) on Ian Fleming's wartime work. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FOUR SEATS by Aaron Cooley
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: June 25, 2015

"A scorching pace makes this savvy thriller a quick read."
In Cooley's (Shaken, Not Stirred, 2013) legal thriller, a U.S. Supreme Court policeman uncovers a conspiracy while searching for the people who bombed the Supreme Court. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHELTER by Beth Cooley
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Nov. 14, 2006

"Readers will find a moving glimpse into a different kind of life, with the more frightening aspects downplayed. (Fiction. YA)"
Sixteen-year-old Lucy's family has been in a downward economic and emotional spiral since the death of her father several months earlier. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

The Thirteen Rules of Love by W.L. Cooley
Released: Sept. 9, 2014

"Although this short work has its limits, it provides a view of love that just might be what the world needs now."
A brief debut primer on love that asks readers to proceed with both caution and bravery. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GUESSWORK by Martha Cooley
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: April 25, 2017

"A quiet memoir with emotional power that is subtle, artful, and piercing."
The author of the honored novel The Archivist (1998) returns with a sometimes-wrenching memoir-in-essays about love and loss. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OSTRICH EYE by Beth Cooley
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Jan. 13, 2004

"Unlike ostriches, this story soars. (Fiction. YA)"
Noting that an ostrich's eye is bigger than its brain, Cooley winningly offers a girl whose observations outpace her reason. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JUDY GARLAND, GINGER LOVE by Nicole Cooley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"A quirky and appealing novel as Cooley builds a riveting story around the sometimes dangerous bonds of family."
An eccentric first novel by poet Cooley explores the sometimes creepy, sometimes entrancing link between identical twins. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ARCHIVIST by Martha Cooley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1998

"A superlative, serious, gripping literary treasure."
A sophisticated and compelling debut—about libraries though without a particle of dust, and with passion galore though about inability to love. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THIRTY-THREE SWOONS by Martha Cooley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 9, 2005

"Cerebral yet heartfelt exercise in connecting unlikely dots."
Russian director commandeers a woman's dreams, forcing her to redefine her tortured notions of family, in Cooley's second (after The Archivist, 1998). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 3, 2001

"A less WASP-ish Twain, but as eccentric as ever."
In a gathering of 13 stories written over four decades, the creator of Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn turns his attention to unconventional girls and women. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 31, 1991

"A skillful weaving of ancient and more current history into an insightful analysis of America's policy problems in the Middle East."
ABC News correspondent Cooley (Libyan Sandstorm, 1982) comprehensively recounts America's protracted involvement in the politics of the Middle East, which, he says, amounts to ``one of the costliest wars since Vietnam...in financial terms [and]...human suffering.'' Cooley traces what he sees as America's Mideast policy failures to its overreliance on the Shah of Iran, whose interests, he argues, America misidentified with its own. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 23, 2012

"A genuine effort to help Christian teenagers, or anyone, maintain or grow a meaningful relationship with God and fellow Christians."
A motivating, accessible guide for young Christians about developing a strong relationship with God. Read full book review >