Search Results: "Adam Hochschild"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 21, 1998

"A searing history of evil and the heroes who exposed it."
Journalist-memoirist Hochschild (Finding the Trapdoor, 1997, etc.) recounts the crimes against humanity of Belgium's King Leopold II, whose brutal imperialist regime sparked the creation of Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness and the first major human-rights protest movement of this century. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 3, 2011

"An ambitious narrative that presents a teeming worldview through intimate, human portraits."
From historian Hochschild (Bury the Chains: The First International Human Rights Movement, 2005, etc.), a selective history of the slaughter of innocents in World War I. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 7, 2005

"A chronicle of a rare and radiant victory by our better angels. (16 pp. b&w photos, not seen)"
A late-18th-century band of abolitionists in England begins the movement that will eventually free nearly one million slaves across the British Empire—and show the world that idealism and a passion for human rights can fill the sails of the ship of state. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SPAIN IN OUR HEARTS by Adam Hochschild
NON-FICTION
Released: March 29, 2016

"Hochschild ably explores subtle shades of the conflict that contemporary authors and participants did not want to consider."
A nuanced look at the messy international allegiances forged during the Spanish Civil War. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE UNQUIET GHOST by Adam Hochschild
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 1994

"As sensitive, subtle, and moving as Chekhov: journalism raised to the level of art."
Although 20 million people died during Stalin's two-decade reign of terror, Russians have only recently, with the advent of glasnost, begun to confront their memories of that time. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1997

"These pieces speak clearly to the times in which they were written, but not to the ages. (illustrations, not seen)"
A collection of magazine articles and time-bound reportage by the estimable Hochschild (The Unquiet Ghost: Russians Remember Stalin, 1994, etc.), cofounder of Mother Jones magazine. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 28, 2013

"Unique, devastating, indelible."
An illumination of a crucial battle within "the war to end all wars" redefines the power and possibilities of graphic narratives. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 23, 1997

"The disappointing failure to press forward with her observations does not prevent this from being a provocative book. (First printing of 50,000; first serial to the New York Times Magazine; author tour; TV satellite tour)"
Along with predictable premises and conclusions, this case study raises unsettling questions about the impact of time on contemporary lives. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TROLL AND THE OLIVER by Adam Stower
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 25, 2015

"Nicely tuned to a preschool sense of the ridiculous. (Picture book. 3-5)"
A clever—and impossibly cute—child thwarts a bumbling beast at every turn. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SILLY DOGGY! by Adam Stower
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2012

"Funny enough, but it won't have much staying power. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Lily's new pet is a real handful. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ME AND MEOW by Adam Gudeon
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2011

"More. (Picture book/early reader. 2-6)"
Gudeon's picture-book debut is high on style and charm as it introduces Me and Meow, a little girl and her cat, in a beginning-reader-friendly tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FRANKENSTEIN MAKES A SANDWICH by Adam Rex
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2006

"Making Judy Sierra's Monster Goose (2001), illustrated by Jack E. Davis, look like an exercise in restraint, here's a read-aloud candidate sure to elicit loud screams—but not of fright. (Poetry. 6-10)"
Readers will relish every gross and hilarious entry in this monstrous menu of misadventures, from the towering appetizer concocted by Frankenstein—a green-skinned Fred Gwynne in Rex's detail-rich, superbly over-the-top illustrations—to the Japanese-inflected closer, "Godzilla Pooped on my Honda." Read full book review >