Search Results: "Adrian Wooldridge"


BOOK REVIEW

BOOK REVIEW

ADRIAN MOLE by Sue Townsend
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"Some of Townsend's veddy British jokes don't cross the Atlantic, but those that do are funny, frivolous, and devastatingly dead-on."
More satirical diaries of a persistently pathetic English everyman pitches brickbats and sourballs at Tony Blair, Princess Di worshippers, TV cooking shows, celibacy, and the ever increasing bunch of village idiots and ne'er-do-wells in Ashby-de-la-Zouch. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 6, 2009

"A meaningful contribution to the ongoing conversation about the place of faith in modern life."
Contrasting the European model of religion (in continual decline) with the American (in continual surge), the authors find that the U.S. model is winning worldwide. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 19, 2014

"A different, provocative view of the challenge emerging in Asia."
Micklethwait and Wooldridge (co-authors: God Is Back: How the Global Revival of Faith Is Changing the World, 2009, etc.), editor in chief and management editor, respectively, of the Economist, anticipate a coming revolution in methods of government on par with the emergence of the welfare state after World War II. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 11, 2003

"An entertaining and even charming excursion in business history, largely unburdened by formulas and numbers but full of debate-stirring data all the same."
Is the corporation a soulless and soul-killing construct, an instrument of unmitigated evil, as Genoese streetfighters and latter-day Naderites are wont to argue? Not necessarily—and not even usually—write two Economist reporters. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ADRIAN MOLE AND THE WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION by Sue Townsend
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 2005

"Laugh-out-loud one-liners ensure that even the uninitiated will enjoy Adrian Mole's journey through Townsend's cruel, comic world."
Loveable loser Adrian Mole turns 35 in the latest installment in the British series. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WICKED JACK by Connie Nordhielm Wooldridge
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 15, 1995

"Everything in these pictures belongs to the sphere of high comedy, and readers will hoot. (Picture book. 5-10)"
Wooldridge's first book is stunning. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LEGEND OF STRAP BUCKNER by Connie Nordhielm Wooldridge
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 15, 2001

"A robust and high-humored version of the Strap Buckner legend, full of the over-the-top yarning now associated with Texas. (author's note, bibliography) (Picture book. 4-8)"
Strap Buckner was one of the original Old Three Hundred to settle Texas with Stephen Austin, and legend rose around him to compete with his serious size. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Sept. 15, 2001

"An author's note includes sources, Web sites, and places to visit. (Nonfiction. 6-9)"
In 1869, at the age of 55, a big woman with a big name—Esther Mae Hobart McQuigg Slack Morris—headed to Wyoming Territory. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 19, 2011

"Rev up the car and hit the road."
Travel journalists Wooldridge and Bleiberg suggest holidays for all budgets. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Aug. 1, 2010

"In all, a useful study that might lead sophisticated young readers to Wharton's novels. (index) (Biography. 12 & up)"
Edith Wharton, a New York City child of wealth and privilege, escaped in several ways, "[b]ut Edith's keen eye, her reading...and her need to tell the truth were the beginnings of her brave escape from the expectations of the society into which she'd been born." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THAT’S NOT FUNNY! by Adrian Johnson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2005

"But probably not. (Picture book. 6-8)"
Johnson lowers the boom—or more precisely, the elephant—on a lad who takes delight in the misfortunes of others in a pointed, if unconvincing, import illustrated in a postmodern, retro-'50s style. Read full book review >