Search Results: "Adrienne Kennaway"


BOOK REVIEW

LITTLE ELEPHANT'S WALK by Adrienne Kennaway
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 28, 1992

"Classified as fiction, but less a story than an excellent introduction to African wildlife. (Picture book. 3-8)"
The 1988 Greenaway winner (Crafty Chameleon), who is noted for striking watercolors illustrating animal fables, surveys African animals as seen by Little Elephant while he roams the plains and forests with his mother. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BUSHBABY by Adrienne Kennaway
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1991

A talented illustrator sets forth on her first solo effort, an engaging pourquoi tale: Yearning for the best figs, little Bushbaby takes a low-tide path to a tree guarded by a sleeping- -but fierce—monitor lizard. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AWKWARD AARDVARK by Mwalimu Hadith
ANIMALS
Released: Jan. 15, 2006

"The origin of the tale is not documented; nevertheless it will be a popular companion to The Baby Beebee Bird by Diane Redfield Massie, newly illustrated by Steven Kellogg in 2000. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Aardvark is driving his fellow forest dwellers crazy with his snoring. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THIS IS THE MOUNTAIN by Miriam Moss
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2011

"Overall: lovely. (Picture book. 6-9)"
The great mountain supports a complex system of flora and fauna. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THIS IS THE REEF by Miriam Moss
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 15, 2007

"A handsome, if not completely accurate, addition to the shelf of similar introductions. (Picture book/nonfiction. 5-7)"
For the latest in a string of visits to natural habitats that began with Arctic Song (1999) and This Is the Tree (2000), Moss and Kennaway dip into the Great Barrier Reef to introduce its huge variety of wildlife and to express concern over its vulnerability. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HUNGRY HYENA by Mwenye Hadithi
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1994

"The art is strong enough to make this a favorite even among those thoughtful enough to recognize the story's fundamental injustice. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Unlike Hadithi's many other animal tales about the meek outwitting the greedy, this is a rather mean-spirited story in which painful punishment is inflicted upon the entire hyena tribe in retaliation for a single hyena's theft of an eagle's dinner. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"There hasn't been a scarier crocodile since the one that ate Captain Hook. (Folklore/Picture book. 4-8)"
From the adapter of The Fire Children (p. 788), a tale that explains how man came to possess fire. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BABY BABOON by Mwenye Hadithi
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 1993

With the artless-seeming economy of a folktale, another fine readaloud from the creators of Crafty Chameleon, etc.: an original tale combining pourquoi and trickster motifs. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JUNGLE SONG by Miriam Moss
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2004

"As back matter, there's a note from author David Bellamy explaining the ecological importance of rain-forest preservation. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Seduced by a spider, Little Tapir ventures away from his sleeping mother and into the rain forest in this rhythmic coming-of-age ode. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THIS IS THE TREE by Miriam Moss
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"Until Barbara Bash's Tree of Life (1989) comes back into print, if it does, consider this a useful, attractive placeholder. (Picture book/nonfiction. 6-8)"
The text may not be quite up to the pictures in this lyrical tribute to the baobab, but children will come away with at least a glimpse of the astonishing biological microcosm that grows on and near these monumental fixtures of the African plains. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DOGS DON'T WEAR GLASSES by Adrienne Geoghegan
ANIMALS
Released: April 16, 1996

"For preschoolers, satisfying silliness. (Picture book. 3-5)"
Nanny Needles, readers discover in the pictures, needs glasses, but she places the blame for all the accidents around the house on her poor dog: When she dumps the trash on the floor, Seymour is reprimanded for his clumsiness; when she washes his blanket and bones instead of the laundry, she decides that Seymour needs a haircut to improve his eyesight. Read full book review >