Search Results: "Agatha Christie"


BOOK REVIEW

BLACK COFFEE by Agatha Christie
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Still, the country-house atmosphere is suitably genteel, and the story holds its own with Christie's undistinguished contemporaneous novels—The Mystery of the Blue Train, The Seven Dials Mystery, and The Murder at the Vicarage."
A brand-new Agatha Christie novel based on material nearly 70 years old. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AND THEN THERE WERE NONE by Agatha Christie
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 21, 1939

"Grand suspense, a unique trick, expertly handled."
This ran in the S.E.P. and resulted in more demands for the story in book form than ever recorded. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DEAD MAN'S MIRROR by Agatha Christie
Released: June 22, 1937

"But Agatha Christie's name means turnover, so don't pass it over."
Long short stories — four of them:- Triangle at Rhodes, Murder in the Mews, The Incredible Theft, and the title story. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 7, 1965

"Smooth and very feminine."
Some of us are hoping for a reincarnation of Hercule Poirot-but not yet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 23, 1963

"Long life to her."
Jane Marple was growing old and frail but her mind- and her curiosity — were as keen as ever and she hated the impositions put upon her. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MISTER PARKER PYNE, DETECTIVE by Agatha Christie
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: June 1, 1934

"Delightful for pick up odd moments."
A collection of short stories, strung on the slender thread of the work of Parker Pyne, happiness expert. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS by Agatha Christie
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 28, 1934

"The reason the US publisher, Dodd Mead, did not use the UK title in 1934 was to avoid confusion with the 1932 Graham Greene novel, Orient Express."
A murder is committed in a stalled transcontinental train in the Balkans, and every passenger has a watertight alibi. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE UNEXPECTED GUEST by Agatha Christie
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"Here, though, Osborne, working with much less creaky material than Black Coffee, manages a few surprises worthy of his master."
Christie biographer Osborne's second novelization of a Christie play (Black Coffee, 1998) opens with a wonderfully arresting scene: engineer Michael Starkwedder, having run his car into a ditch while poking around the Welsh countryside looking at houses, enters Richard Warwick's house looking for help, only to find the man himself, a big-game hunter now confined to a wheelchair, shot to death. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MONOGRAM MURDERS by Sophie Hannah
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 9, 2014

"Despite the names and dates, this authorized sequel will remind you less of Christie, whose strengths are very different from Hannah's, than of the dozens of other pastiches of golden age detective fiction among which it takes its place."
Hercule Poirot, last spotted in Charles Osborne's novelization Black Coffee (1998), returns from retirement to investigate a triple poisoning in 1929 London. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SPIDER’S WEB by Agatha Christie
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 1, 2000

"If this adaptation repeats the sales of those two, expect an Osborne version of Verdict, Christie's last original mystery play, in time for next Christmas."
Osborne's third novelization of a Christie play—this one based on a 1954 original that ran for two years alongside the West End perennials Witness for the Prosecution and The Mousetrap—takes place in still another country house that, except for the impending hush-hush visit of the Prime Minister and the Soviet premier, could be frozen back in the '20s. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CLOSED CASKET by Sophie Hannah
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"As in The Monogram Murders (2014), Hannah provides both less and more than Agatha Christie ever baked into any of her tales. But the climactic revelation that establishes the killer's motive is every bit as brilliant and improbable as any of Christie's own decorous thunderclaps."
A famous Irish author of children's mysteries announces that she's just disinherited her family before a gathering that includes those very family members—along with Hercule Poirot. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE REGATTA MYSTERY by Agatha Christie
Released: June 20, 1939

"But don't recommend it."
Without doubt this is the worst collection of second rate mysteries in short story from ever perpetrated — and published — by a writer whose standard is usually as dependably high as Agatha Christie's. Read full book review >