Search Results: "Aisha Tyler"


BOOK REVIEW

SELF-INFLICTED WOUNDS by Aisha Tyler
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 9, 2013

"Smart, sassy and surprisingly wise."
An actress and comedian's episodic ruminations about the painful blunders that helped shape her as a person and a successful stand-up comic. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WRITTEN IN THE STARS by Aisha Saeed
YOUNG ADULT
Released: March 24, 2015

"A competent narrative that sheds light on the difficult phenomenon of forced marriage, still prevalent in many cultures around the world and often shrouded in silence. (author's note, resources) (Fiction. 12-18)"
A Pakistani-American teen, caught between two cultures, finds herself at risk of losing her independence to a deceptively arranged marriage. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHAT YOU WILL SEE INSIDE A MOSQUE by Aisha Karen Khan
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2003

"Succinct, but informative, this can be used by schools, families, and religious education groups to encourage some sorely needed tolerance in this time of international strife. (Nonfiction. 6-10)"
As a woman who has embraced Islam, Khan is eager to share her religion with North American children. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FROGGY WENT A-COURTIN’ by Gillian Tyler
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 2005

"Um-hum. (source note) (Picture book. 6-8)"
Tyler highlights the romance in this frilly version of the folk song, following Froggy and Miss Mousie from courtship to honeymoon in pale, finely brushed outdoor scenes captioned in elegant, if low-contrast, gold ink. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

METAPATTERNS by Tyler Volk
NON-FICTION
Released: June 15, 1995

"But does it? (photos, not seen, and illustrations) (Book-of-the-Month Club selection)"
A vision of nature through eyes looking for patterns in space and time. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 6, 2016

"An invaluable handbook to surviving, thriving, and controlling one's image online."
A comprehensive guide to managing one's Web presence. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NOAH’S COMPASS by Anne Tyler
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 2, 2009

"And so will be the reader."
Instead of the measured critical commentary typically found here, let's consider this column a mash note. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 18, 2016

"An endlessly fascinating kaleidoscope of American history. A fantastic historical resource."
From the Dutch to the British, featuring a concentration on the waves of Irish and German in the late 19th century, this thoroughgoing work offers a host of immigrant sagas that were integral to the creation of the New York City cauldron. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JANITORS by Tyler  Whitesides
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 3, 2011

"An implausible but entertaining ruckus: Squeamish readers may never touch a school water fountain again. (Fantasy. 10-13)"
With both cleanliness and educational function at stake, a government agency and a rebel faction duke it out in the halls, restrooms and classrooms of an Idaho elementary school. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLUE GLASS by Sandra Tyler
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 15, 1992

"A promising beginning."
An unpretentious but accomplished first novel about the bittersweet relationship between a mother and a daughter, refreshingly free of either anger or sentimentality. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 31, 2001

"A highly entertaining, if ultimately depressing, saga of greed and good-ol'-boy immorality. (b&w photos)"
A journalist picks through an unsavory gumbo of political corruption in the Pelican State. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CLOCK WINDER by Anne Tyler
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1972

"Another gently insidious exposure of the adders under the veranda."
Miss Tyler again explores family connections in terms of compensatory stress and balances, necessary exclusions, and the loneliness of outsiders resisting absorption. Mrs. Emerson is the vortex of the Baltimore Emerson family, a widow "wearing pastels, holding out smooth white hands with polished nails," to receive her intermittently returning seven children whom she controls with charged verbiage: "Oh, everything she said nowadays was attached to other things by long gluey strands. . . touching off chords, opening doors." Read full book review >