Search Results: "Alain Mabanckou"


BOOK REVIEW

BLACK MOSES by Alain Mabanckou
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 6, 2017

"This tightly contained, densely packed story issues a challenge that never loses its urgency: how does a person cling to a sense of autonomy when it's under siege by so many powerful forces?"
This ribald, acerbic, and poignant coming-of-age story throws open a window to an African nation's struggle for maturity. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LETTER TO JIMMY by Alain Mabanckou
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 16, 2014

"The conceit of the letter and the oddly intimate tone toward 'Jimmy' make this a curious work, but it's often insightful and illuminating."
A celebration of James Baldwin's literature and legacy published in commemoration of the 20th anniversary of his death. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BROKEN GLASS by Alain Mabanckou
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2010

"Important, entertaining and subtly moving."
The award-winning African author (African Psycho, 2007) returns with a novel about Africa and the West. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLUE WHITE RED by Alain Mabanckou
Released: March 11, 2013

"A novel of few surprises, it must be seen for what it is: the uneven debut novel of a significant author with a growing reputation."
A coming-of-age story of immigration and disillusionment that begins in post-colonial Congo. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LIGHTS OF POINTE-NOIRE by Alain Mabanckou
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2016

"A tender, poetic chronicle of an exile's return."
Beset by memories, a Congolese writer revisits his native village. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALL SHOOK UP! by Alain Crozon
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2015

"Don't bother to lift these flaps. (Novelty board book. 2-4)"
Whimsical, big-eyed animals move to an Elvis beat with the lift or swing of a flap. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE IMMOBILE EMPIRE by Alain Peyrefitte
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"But while Peyrefitte's nearly day-by-day account will fascinate Sinologists and students of East-West affairs, it may prove too detailed for the average reader. (Sixteen pages of full-color illustrations and six maps—not seen.)"
A painstakingly researched, gracefully written, but far too leisurely account of the misadventures of an 18th-century British royal delegation to the Celestial Court of the Chinese Emperor Qianlong. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NOTRE-DAME DE PARIS by Alain Erlande-Brandenburg
NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1998

"He also devotes considerable space to a discussion of the nature of the magnificent sculptures of saints, sinners, and demons added to the exterior of the cathedral, and its stained-glass windows. (262 illustrations, including 138 in color)"
While art historian Erlande-Brandenburg's careful, vigorous study of the construction of one of the greatest medieval cathedrals and of the symbolic intentions of its architecture, sculpture, and stained glass, does not break new ground, it does offer a clear, useful review of Notre Dame's long history and importance. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Night Cream by Diana Pollin
Released: March 21, 2016

"Vampirism is simply another obstacle for greedy and often indifferent characters in this irreverent story."
In this supernatural tale, a woman uses her new relationship with a vampire for a business opportunity—selling his blood as a face cream. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I HAVE THE RIGHT TO BE A CHILD by Alain Serres
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 12, 2012

"Provocative and guaranteed to spark awareness of children's rights. (note on the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child; list of states party to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child) (Picture book. 4-7)"
From the bold opening assertion, "I am a child with eyes, hands, a voice, a heart, and rights," to the urgent closing plea, "We need our rights to be respected now—today," this primer invites young readers to think about their universal rights as children as embodied in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. Read full book review >