Search Results: "Alan Alda"


BOOK REVIEW

THINGS I OVERHEARD WHILE TALKING TO MYSELF by Alan Alda
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 11, 2007

"For Alda devotees and fans of Robert Fulghum."
Avuncular life lessons from 70-something actor and bestselling author Alda (Never Have Your Dog Stuffed: And Other Things I've Learned, 2005). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 6, 2017

"A sharp and informative guide to communication."
A distinguished actor and communication expert shows how to avoid "the snags of misunderstanding" that plague verbal interactions between human beings. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HURRY GRANNY ANNIE by Arlene Alda
Released: Aug. 1, 1999

"Aldridge's watercolors, done in shimmering golden hues, illuminate the beauty of an autumn sunset; she also includes whimsical elements for astute observers. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A rollicking cross country sprint with their energetic grandmother leads siblings Ruthie and Joe and their friend to a wondrous discovery. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HERE A FACE, THERE A FACE by Arlene Alda
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 11, 2008

"A short rhymed text helps to identify each object or locale. (Picture book. 4-6)"
The world takes on a decidedly animistic aspect in this photo album, as Alda's camera finds faces on trees and buildings, in the kitchen and the bathroom, in patterns on rugs, windows, the fronts of post-office mailboxes and even the slashes on round loaves of bread. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PIG, HORSE, OR COW, DON'T WAKE ME NOW by Arlene Alda
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 1994

"Without any serious attempt at integrating its elements, this book is no reason to jump out of bed. (Fiction/Picture book. 3-7)"
The concept is simple: Each animal on the farm, as it wakes up, rouses its neighbor, until, finally, the boy of the house rises and begins his day. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HELLO, GOOD-BYE by Arlene Alda
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 10, 2009

"Of course they are, particularly when compared to pumpkins and squashes, but it's still a novel way of seeing them, one that offers children (and adults) an enchanting new perspective. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Although it seems simple, the concept of opposites can be difficult for very young children to grasp. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JUST KIDS FROM THE BRONX by Arlene Alda
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 3, 2015

"Entertaining and informative cherished memories from a diverse group from the Bronx."
Short essays connected by a common thread: a childhood spent in the Bronx. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MORNING GLORY MONDAY by Arlene Alda
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

"However, Kovalski's muted art makes the time and place come alive, her tenement neighborhoods bustle with energy and appeal, and her characters' faces are most expressive. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Mama, living on New York's Lower East Side in the 1930s with her husband and young daughter, is homesick for her native Italy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LULU'S PIANO LESSON by Arlene Alda
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 10, 2010

"As lessons go, it's a mighty nice one. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Lulu's piano teacher, Mr Sharp, is a pretty sharp guy indeed, dressed all in black and sporting a bowtie, and it turns out he is quite a good teacher, too. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IRIS HAS A VIRUS by Arlene Alda
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 9, 2008

"Written in a somewhat mystifying mix of prose and verse, this is a pricey but refreshing cup of literary chicken soup for illin' children. (Picture book. 6-8)"
Providing low-key reassurance for anyone who's had to stay in bed with a bug, Alda tracks young Iris's three-day malaise from that general feeling that things are not quite right, through limp exhaustion, nausea ("Her head was hot. / She threw up in a pot"), a soothing visit to the doctor, troubled dreams of "Bugs with spots, / Bugs on cots, / Bugs like ants, / Bugs with pants" and on to full recovery. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 2001

"But many will find the biographies of their grandparents and great-grandparents in this study. (Nonfiction. 9-11)"
At one time, the Lower East Side of New York City was said to have greater population density than any other city on earth. Read full book review >