Search Results: "Alan Boss"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 2009

"Solid coverage of one of the most exciting topics in science, but the bureaucratic infighting almost spoils the party."
An astronomer's tale of the search for extrasolar planets, including a critique of NASA's role. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

ALAN GRATZ
by Megan Labrise

To many Americans, the plight of refugees can seem remote—until you find their boat.

Middle-grade novelist Alan Gratz was vacationing in the Florida Keys when his family discovered an abandoned escape raft during a walk on the beach.

“It was clearly a raft from some other place in the Caribbean, trying to get to America,” says Gratz, whom Kirkus ...


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BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1997

"A fuzzy, warm book without clear aims, serious methods, or tough analytical edges. (For a view of male sex fantasies, see Bob Berkowitz, His Secret Life, p. 513.) ($35,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
Sex therapist Maltz (The Sexual Healing Journey, not reviewed, etc.) and journalist Boss stroll rather too casually through the thickets of the secret garden first explored by Nancy Friday nearly 25 years ago. Read full book review >

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ALAN BURDICK
by Gregory McNamee

Time is fleeting. Time flies. There’s never enough of it. With apologies to Irma Thomas, the greatest interpreter of the song “Time Is On My Side,” it’s really not.

We modern humans are bound to clocks, to having to be particular places at particular moments, to occupying certain points of the space-time continuum at, well, certain points. But thus ...


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BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1999

"Insightful, practical, and refreshingly free of psychobabble."
A compassionate exploration of the effects of ambiguous loss and how those experiencing it handle this most devastating of losses. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2006

"A fine nonfiction collection, marred only by its rather odd title. (bibliography) (Nonfiction/collective biography. 9-14)"
Each of the five people profiled in this fascinating collection has won a National Heritage Fellowship, but young readers probably won't care about that. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

LEE ALAN DUGATKIN
by Gregory McNamee

It’s a story as old as humankind: Somewhere, one of our ancestors threw a bone out into the darkness beyond the campfire, a wolf snatched it up, and its grateful descendants transformed themselves into dogs for our companionship. The process, it’s been supposed, took thousands of years, millennia in which those fierce, lethal hunters of the northern forests evolved—or devolved ...


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BOOK REVIEW

NIGHT HUNGER by Alan Gibbons
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2013

"Reads like preteen-authored Twilight fanfic; only worth it for its intended purpose. (Horror. 11-17)"
Cursed with a ravenous nighttime appetite, will John hurt the ones he loves? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TILT by Alan Cumyn
CLASSICS
Released: Aug. 9, 2011

"The comedy and drama are both mild, but the two eminently likable teens at the center of it look capable of keeping heads and hearts in balance in a world subject to sudden tilts. (Fiction. 13-16)"
Almost despite himself, 16-year-old Stan emerges with flying colors from a week of sweet confusion, domestic turmoil and momentous tests of character. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CASSIE LOVES BEETHOVEN by Alan Arkin
ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 1, 2000

"Whether readers' acquaintance with great music is intimate or just nodding, this epiphanic episode is sure to incite laughter and deeper thoughts. (Fiction. 10-13)"
Never has music wrought more profound change than in this engaging bucolic tale from the author of Some Fine Grampa! (1995). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SAMURAI SHORTSTOP by Alan Gratz
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: May 1, 2006

"The graphic opening chapter makes this for older readers, who will find it an unusual take on the American (and Japanese) pastime. (author's notes, bibliography) (Fiction. 14+)"
Commodore Perry sailed into Yokohama harbor in 1853, and only a few years later, in 1870, baseball was introduced into Japan, along with many other Western influences. Read full book review >