Search Results: "Alan Paul"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2011

"A charming exploration of an expat's unlikely rise to fame, as well as the lessons learned along the way."
A man's serendipitous rise from writer to rock star in China. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 18, 2014

"The author doesn't pull punches, but all involved should find it fair as well as comprehensive."
"I have viewed everything with the eyes and ears of a journalist but the heart and soul of a fan," writes Guitar World senior writer Paul (Big in China: My Unlikely Adventures Raising a Family, Playing the Blues, and Becoming a Star in Beijing, 2011), who spent decades and hundreds of interviews earning the trust of musicians who didn't always trust each other. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A HISTORY OF MONEY by Alan Pauls
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 2, 2015

"A well-intentioned experiment that's hobbled by its longueurs."
A man recalls his past through the filter of money—often ill-gotten or badly spent—in this inventive if tangled tale. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

ALAN GRATZ
by Megan Labrise

To many Americans, the plight of refugees can seem remote—until you find their boat.

Middle-grade novelist Alan Gratz was vacationing in the Florida Keys when his family discovered an abandoned escape raft during a walk on the beach.

“It was clearly a raft from some other place in the Caribbean, trying to get to America,” says Gratz, whom Kirkus ...


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PAUL AUSTER
by J.W. Bonner

We live our lives mostly in the moment, but also attendant to the question of what if?— what if we had lived in that town rather than the one I know? what if my father (or mother) had died? what if my parents had divorced? what if I had attended school X rather than school Y? what if I ...


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ALAN BURDICK
by Gregory McNamee

Time is fleeting. Time flies. There’s never enough of it. With apologies to Irma Thomas, the greatest interpreter of the song “Time Is On My Side,” it’s really not.

We modern humans are bound to clocks, to having to be particular places at particular moments, to occupying certain points of the space-time continuum at, well, certain points. But thus ...


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PAMELA PAUL
by Claiborne Smith

Readers who know Pamela Paul’s books before she became the editor of the New York Times Book Review know that they are serious works of nonfiction: The Starter Marriage and the Future of Matrimony (2002), Pornified: How Pornography Is Damaging Our Lives, Our Relationships, and Our Families (2005), and Parenting, Inc.: How the Billion-Dollar Baby Business Has Changed the Way ...


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WHERE SHERLOCK HOLMES MEETS FANTASY
by John DeNardo

If Benjamin Franklin were alive today, he'd say that nothing in the world is certain except death, taxes, and Sherlock Holmes stories. Sherlock Holmes, the iconic consulting detective created by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in 1887, is a perennial mainstay in the literary world. What's not to like? Holmes' methods of investigation and deductions are flawless and the ...


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LEE ALAN DUGATKIN
by Gregory McNamee

It’s a story as old as humankind: Somewhere, one of our ancestors threw a bone out into the darkness beyond the campfire, a wolf snatched it up, and its grateful descendants transformed themselves into dogs for our companionship. The process, it’s been supposed, took thousands of years, millennia in which those fierce, lethal hunters of the northern forests evolved—or devolved ...


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WINTER WINNERS
by Julie Danielson

It may not be winter yet, but the cozy, winter picture books are already on shelves. I’ve two on my mind today, Snow Scene and When the Moon Comes, that make me long to see snowflakes.

I’m really glad that long-time editor Richard Jackson decided to start penning picture books. He has written four thus far (Have a Look, Says ...


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ROBOFICTION
by Leila Roy

This marks the very last week of my library’s Summer Reading Program, and I’ve been so busy working on all of the details—making lists of kids who’ve earned various merit badges, making lists of books to buy to celebrate said merit badges, printing out and personalizing a billion bookplates, etc—that reading has been ENTIRELY off the table.

That doesn’t mean ...


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BOOK REVIEW

THE GOOD, THE BAT, AND THE UGLY by Paul Magrs
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: June 1, 2004

"Casually savage, and a little slow off the mark, this isn't going to draw a crowd of readers, but some might be amused. (Fiction. YA)"
Snow's vignettes of brutally dismembered sock puppets, plus a literally hellish plot twist toward the end, keep this satiric import afloat—just. Read full book review >