Search Results: "Alan Rabinowitz"


BOOK REVIEW

A BOY AND A JAGUAR by Alan Rabinowitz
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 6, 2014

"Moving and sweetly resonant. (Picture book/biography. 3-8)"
A simple memoir recounts a lifelong bond between a child who felt "broken" and the animals, especially jaguars, that have informed his life's work. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AN INDOMITABLE BEAST by Alan Rabinowitz
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 2, 2014

"An irresistible account that will be of great interest to conservationists and may make cat lovers look at their pets' behaviors with new eyes."
One of the world's leading experts on big cats writes passionately on behalf of the beasts he loves. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AMERICAN PULP by Paula Rabinowitz
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 5, 2014

"An ardent collector of pulp fiction, Rabinowitz brings to this scholarly study a passion for the genre and an authoritative analysis of its meaning in American culture.
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How cheap books opened a world of ideas to new readers.
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BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 27, 2003

"An uncompromising look at a troubling bias in our legal system."
Wall Street Journal editorial board member and Pulitzer-winner Rabinowitz revisits some of the most spectacular sexual-abuse trials of the 1980s—and concludes the guilty verdicts were egregious miscarriages of justice. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

ALAN GRATZ
by Megan Labrise

To many Americans, the plight of refugees can seem remote—until you find their boat.

Middle-grade novelist Alan Gratz was vacationing in the Florida Keys when his family discovered an abandoned escape raft during a walk on the beach.

“It was clearly a raft from some other place in the Caribbean, trying to get to America,” says Gratz, whom Kirkus ...


Read the full post >

BOOK REVIEW

MUSIC OF THEIR HOOVES by Nancy Springer
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 1994

"Index. (Poetry. 8-12)"
Attractively laid out in picture book format with lively, realistic watercolors of horses in action, 20 poems with a pleasing diversity of settings and horse personalities. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MILO by Alan Silberberg
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 14, 2010

"Middle-school readers will find his school life familiar and painfully funny, but they may be surprised by the poignancy of his story. (Fiction. 10-14)"
Seventh grader Milo Cruikshank narrates and illustrates an up-and-down year in yet another new school. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOW DOGS REALLY WORK! by Alan Snow
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"De gustibus. (Fiction. 6-9)"
Cutaway cartoons reveal that the Dog is really filled with levers, pistons, tubes, vats, memory banks, sniff motors, and waste disposal plumbing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TWO TINY MICE by Alan Baker
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 1991

"The expansive, delicately detailed illustrations are the focus here; they are a pleasure—and a quiet reminder that this world is worth preserving. (Picture book. 2-7)"
The mice may be tiny, but they're displayed to fine advantage—and often larger than life—in this big, handsome book whose text simply enumerates the other creatures the mice see in the lovely British countryside, then tucks them in their nest for the night. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WORSE THINGS HAPPEN AT SEA! by Alan Snow
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 9, 2013

"There's foolery aplenty, but this is the sort of sequel that offers more of the same rather than any new twists or developments. (partial cast list) (Fantasy. 11-13)"
More cheese-centric shenanigans take the multispecies cast of Here Be Monsters (2006) far from the town of Ratbridge. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TRUTH ABOUT CATS by Alan Snow
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1996

"But even those who dislike cats may not be in the audience for this one—it is too mild to be amusing. (Picture book. 4-8)"
This companion to How Dogs Really Work (1993) explains that cats originate on Planet Nip, that they are here in a struggle for world domination, etc. The tone is tongue in cheek throughout, but the text itself is not very funny; the endless explanations will bore preschoolers, and older readers can find funnier stuff on their own. Read full book review >